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Where to Look for Confidence in Your Sewing Practice

Making stuff is brings up issues around confidence because it’s a constant process of learning, and learning will always challenge you. In this episode, Sarai and Haley share 5 moments in your sewing practice that will boost your self-confidence.

Posted in: Seamwork Radio Podcast • March 7, 2023 • Episode 132

As with many things in life, when it comes to sewing there is always an apparent struggle and a hidden struggle.

The apparent struggle is usually pretty obvious to you. Maybe you’re having trouble learning to install a zipper perfectly, or you can’t figure out why your machine is always jamming up, or you never quite get the fit you want when you make pants.

But underneath that, there is an internal struggle that’s a bit harder to get to. Although there are many kinds of internal struggle that making clothing for yourself can bring up, one of the most prevalent is the struggle with self-confidence.

Listen to this episode to learn 5 moments to look for confidence while you sew.

Podcast Transcript

Sarai
I'm Sarai.

Haley
And I'm Haley.

Sarai
And this is Seamwork Radio. Welcome back to Seamwork Radio, where we share practical ideas for building a creative process so you can sew with intention and joy.

Today, we're talking about where to find confidence in your sewing practice day to day. So we're going to cover five different moments you might experience while you're sewing that can actually help you to build up your confidence and how you can get the most from them so you can begin to really trust your sewing instincts. All right, Haley, so I want to ask you, are there any projects that you're currently having a hard time finishing?

Icebreaker: Are there any projects you’re currently having a hard time finishing?

Haley
Always. The answer is always. The one that stands out to me right now is I cut a Madhu, like a couple of months ago. I'm actually probably, like, 80% done with it. I just have to finish attaching and topstitching a couple of the facings. But the fabric is so annoying to work with, and when I was cutting it, I was like, I should have spray stabilized this before I started working with it. And it's just annoying me so much that I straight up, two days ago, cut a second Madhu because I'm like, I really want this, but I'm kind of overworking with that fabric.

Sarai
Is it really slippery?

Haley
It's not slippery. It's just really shifty, which, with all the casings and stuff and topstitching, is really annoying. So I was thinking to myself, like, oh, I'm going to trick myself into finishing the other one because I know I'll like it when I'm done. And then I'll be like, oh, I want another one. I have this one that's almost done. So here is hoping that my playing tricks on myself works.

Sarai
That's a really good reminder for me because I just bought this fabric for this dress that I'm making, and it's also really shifty. And then I bought a lining fabric yesterday, and I know that's going to be really shifty. And I thought, well, it'll probably be okay. But now that you say that, yeah, I'm going to buy some spray stabilizer myself for this because I know it's going to be a pain in the butt.

Haley
It's always worth it. I, like, cut the facings for my second Madhu out of a really shifty gauze fabric, and I was like, fool me once, shame on you, fabric. And so I spray stabilized it, and I was feeling really clever about it, to be honest.

Sarai
That fool me onnce quote always reminds me of George W. Bush .Fool me once. Fool me twice…can’t be fooled again.

Well, I definitely have some projects that have been sitting on the back burner for way too long. I have two that come to mind. One is an Easton jacket that I think I cut out well over a year ago. And it's right over there in the corner in a basket, and I haven't touched it since, because there's a lot of barriers in the way, like things I need to learn before I do some of the extra detail I want to add to it. And now we're getting kind of into spring sewing, and it's more of like a cool weather jacket. So I think it might wait quite a while longer here.

Haley
Just remember that in the Pacific Northwest, it's not spring until July.

Sarai
Yeah, I know, it's true. But I'm just in a springtime mood now, and I want dresses and light things.

Haley
I get that.

Sarai
And then the other thing is a knitting project that I have been working on for probably six months, and it's not even one that should I mean, should I'm not going to should myself about it, but it's kind of like a larger gauge. It's not anything that typically would take a really long time, but I have it 99% done. I really just need to bind off a cuff and do a neckband on it and that's it.

And it is sitting in a tote bag next to my bed, and I just cannot get in the mood to finish it. I don't know why. It's just one of those things. It just happens sometimes.

Haley
Don't should yourself. You'll get there.

Sarai
Probably. Maybe not, but it's worth trying anyway. Like most things, you never get there 100%. And that's kind of what we're talking about a little bit today.

Haley
It is.

Sarai
But if you have an icebreaker for us for a future episode, this one, I actually came up with this icebreaker today because I wanted to talk about my unfinished project. But if you have one for us, you can leave it for us. If you're a member, just go here, and you can leave a question there that we'll use to start out a future episode.

So today we're talking about confidence as a sewer. And I think it's really interesting because the absence of confidence oftentimes holds us back from trying things. And it's kind of ironic because your lack of confidence can stop you from starting to sew or to continue your sewing. But sewing itself is such an incredibly confidence-building activity.

So you get in kind of like this cycle of not having confidence and not doing the things that are going to help you build confidence.

We want to talk about getting through that cycle today and maybe pushing your boundaries a little bit. So how do you push through those two contrary things so you can arrive in a more confident place?

Ithis episode, we're going to talk about building confidence in your sewing abilities, and we're not going to be talking about body stuff, about body confidence.

But if you would like to hear more about that, leave us a comment in the community or leave us a review and let us know. And maybe we can do a follow-up episode in the future about that as well. But today we're going to be talking about confidence in your sewing skills.

So confidence is not something that you get overnight. So what is it about sewing that builds confidence? And how can you cultivate it more intentionally? Because there's really no magic formula if you're building confidence. But we're going to talk about the places in sewing where you'll find opportunities to build your confidence. So let's start out, Haley, how would you define confidence?

What is confidence?

Haley
My definition of confidence? I think it's pretty simple. I think confidence is just—in the sense of confidence in your skills—it’s trusting yourself. Yeah, I think that's what it is kind of comes down to. What about you?

Sarai
Yeah, I think trust is a really good word for it and I see it kind of on a spectrum. It's not like you have confidence or you don't have confidence. I don't see it as a binary thing, but both exist on a spectrum.

It also comes in waves and sometimes you might feel more confident. Some days you might feel more confident and some days you might feel less confident. And that could be attributable to a lot of different factors, not just your abilities. It could be your mood, it could be other things going on in your life. It could be, how long it's been since the last time you sewed or the last time you did this particular thing. I think that's true of other creative activities too.

Haley
Yeah.

Sarai
Like with knitting, if I haven't knitted anything in, you know, months, then when I get back to it, I kind of have to refresh myself and I feel a lot less confident, which, or me, it's an inhibitor. I feel like I don't want to do it because I don't feel like I can just jump into it as easily.

Haley
Yeah.

Sarai
So it can be a little bit of a barrier, I think.

Haley
I agree. When do you feel the most confident while you're sewing?

When do you feel the most confident when you’re sewing?

Sarai
I feel the most confident, I would say either going into something that I know is going to be easy for me, that I've done many times before, or when I've finished a project. And maybe it's a more complex project or it has elements that I haven't tried before, but I've finished them and I've learned things and I've maybe done something that's new to me.

That's interesting because those are two very different experiences.

Haley
Yeah.

Sarai
What about you? Do you feel that way?

Haley
I agree with that. I definitely feel confident in those moments. I feel pretty confident when I'm fitting my own body, just because—me and her, we're old friends, we go way back.

I know all of the nuances and it just feels like a very I've gotten to a place where it feels very intuitive to me. And I guess that's kind of the theme of where I feel the most confidence is when I am in a situation with my sewing where it feels really intuitive.

Sarai
That's a really good point. That made me think about sports, actually. And how when you're learning a new motor skill in sports, you have to practice it very intentionally. Like, for example, I do weightlifting, and if you're learning how to deadlift, you have to remember all the steps of setting it up and getting your form right. And you have to remember all these things. But then as you gain confidence, when you actually go to do it, you stop thinking about those things. It just becomes ingrained.

So I think it's really interesting to think about the role of intuition in your confidence and how you have to intentionally get to a place where you have that intuition.

Haley
Yeah. I mean, it's good old neuroplasticity. Your brain is constantly forming these new pathways because we're constantly learning. And as you continue to practice those learned skills, they become more rote for you.

Sarai
And that just feels good. There's something about that that just feels really good when you can do something and just get into that flow state really easily.

Haley
Yeah, definitely. I think it has a lot to do with that flow state. It's a very pleasurable state for your mind to be in.

Sarai
Yeah.

Haley
So on the other side of the coin, when do you feel insecure when you're sewing?

When do you feel insecure when you’re sewing?

Sarai
Oh, that's a great question. I don't know that I would label it as insecurity, but maybe part of it is.

I feel like it's when I get frustrated, maybe when I run out of time to do something, or maybe I've cut a corner and I shouldn't have done that. I'm should-ing myself again. When I've cut a corner and maybe it would have been best to take more time with it. And then I think, gosh, then the shoulds come in. I should have known better. And then that's when I feel less secure, I think.

What about you?

Haley
I would say that I think that something that can really make me feel insecure is a tricky fabric. Because sometimes it does not matter how many tools you have in your toolbox or techniques you know. Sometimes like a tricky fabric can just throw you through a loop.

I feel like that's one place where once in a while I'll still get feel really insecure when you're just like keep on coming up against walls. You tried this, you tried that, and nothing seems to be working. So if you're listening to this and you struggle with that—me too.

Sarai
Yeah. I think fabric is a real wildcard when it comes to home sewing because I think a lot of people don't think about this, but when clothing is made for ready to wear, fabric isn't so much of a wild card because it's tested in that fabric. And at the point of manufacture, you're making the same thing over and over and over again. And you found the fabric that works with the pattern.

In home sewing, there's so many more combinations of fabric and pattern, and you're making it and testing it at the same time, really, to see how it's going to look. And you have to kind of rely a little bit more on that intuition and that knowledge. And I think in some ways, it makes home sewing harder.

Haley
Oh, definitely. Some fabrics are really prone to stretching out as you cut and you sew them. And in a ready to wear setting, they accommodate for all of those things. They're anticipating that it's going to stretch out 10% in the crossgrain, so they make sure that they're building in less ease for that. Like you said, we're learning as we go in lots of places, and it's all really kind of one big experiment sometimes.

Sarai
Also makes it fun, too.

Haley
It does. That's true.

Sarai
I think that's why building that confidence is so important. That's why we're talking about it today.

Haley
Yeah. So my final discussion question for you is, at what point in your sewing journey did you begin to feel confident?

When did you start to feel confident in your sewing?

Sarai
Well, you know, like I was saying before, I think it's more of a spectrum rather than a binary.

So I don't feel like there was a point where I said, oh, now I'm good at sewing, now I'm confident. But I think there are certain projects that were larger projects that were. Looking back on them, I feel like, wow, that was really cool what I did. And that makes me feel confident thinking back on them.

Like my wedding dress, for example. I always think about that one because it had so many details, and I put so much design thought into it. I really thought about it, and I really invested in the materials and spent my time making muslins, making sure it fit, finding exactly what I wanted. And I feel like just that project is one of those really memorable ones for me that I can look back on and say—I don't know, it wasn't like that is what inspired my confidence. But I think in retrospect, it boosts my confidence to think about it.

What about you? How do you feel about it?

Haley
I agree. I think there was lots of things that were points where I feel like I really leveled up my confidence. You talking about your wedding dress made me think of my experience as sewing wedding dresses for other people.

And the first time I sewed a wedding dress for someone, someone asked me to do it. It wasn't like I was out there seeking that work in particular, and I was like, I don't know, that's like a lot of pressure, and I needed the money, so I did it. And it turned out so amazing. And that was like a really confidence-building moment for me because there was a lot of steps along the way where I was like, I don't know if I'm going to be able to pull this off.

I was using her mom's wedding dress and her prom dress to make the dress, and she's constantly losing weight, and her body was changing all the time, and I was like, I don't know. But then when I saw her in it at her final fitting, I was like, man, I'm good at this.

Sarai
I rule.

Haley
And then that's when I started seeking out custom wedding dresses because I was like, oh, I could do this. This could be a thing that I could do.

Sarai
That's really cool and really interesting. Again, it was going into something that you thought, oh, this is going to be really hard, and then doing it and seeing, hey, I can actually do this. This is really cool.

Haley
Yeah, and it was hard. It was really hard. But at the end of it, I was able to realize all that I gained from that experience.

Sarai
Well, that kind of brings us into the main meat of what we wanted to talk about today, which is those moments that really help to build your confidence while sewing.

So we were talking about how confidence comes from trusting yourself. When you show up for yourself and you're really consistent with your sewing practice, you start to find confidenc in certain places while you're sewing.

I think what's interesting is that a lot of these moments are actually pretty frustrating. They're not necessarily the most fun moments of sewing. And the way I like to think about this, building confidence is sort of like ascending this really long staircase. Actually, you can think of as a never-ending staircase because it never really ends. But it's this very long staircase. And each of these moments that I'm going to talk about, they're like steps in building your confidence over time.

So there are steps on that staircase, but taking a step up the staircase takes effort, and climbing the staircase can be pretty uncomfortable. It's not necessarily always fun. Each step can be a little bit of discomfort. And so when you notice yourself getting frustrated in your sewing, you might also want to see if what you're actually experiencing is just one of these steps on this path to confidence.

So we're going to talk about five things you can look for. Five of these moments that you can look for that might actually just be steps in your path to confidence, rather than just frustrating moments, which they can be as well, but they might be both.

So the first one we're going to talk about is problem solving. This comes up in sewing all the time because the instructions, they're there to be helpful, but they can only help you so much because there are just so many different factors, kind of like what Haley and I were just talking about with fabric. So you're always going to be off-roading a lot of the time. And the more you do that, the more you're going to trust your own instincts to make really smart, informed decisions.

So maybe, Haley, can you give us an example of a time where you see this happen?

Moment 1: Problem-solving

Haley
Yeah, I mean, there's so many times where this happens. Something that comes to mind is choosing interfacing.

So you pick a pattern. It says you need a half yard of fusible interfacing, and then you go to the fabric store and there's like an entire shelf with 20 different kinds of interfacing. That is a moment where the instructions aren't going to tell you what to do.

You might be able to pause for a moment and Google, use Google and figure out find a tutorial or some pointers on it. But ultimately you're going to have to think critically about your fabric that you're choosing to work with, the finished product that you're trying to achieve, and you're going to have to make a judgment call on that.

And sometimes you'll make the right decision and sometimes you'll make maybe not the right decision, and that's okay.

Not everything can be written out for you. And having that moment of problem solving to build your confidence is so key.

Sarai
Yeah, I think this operates on a couple of levels because I think there's the confidence in actually solving whatever particular problem you have at that moment, like the interfacing problem, for example, and now you know the answer to that question and you'll be able to solve it next time. But there's also having confidence in your ability to solve problems generally and not have the answer right away.

I think that's really cool because that seems to me more generally applicable to life too, that's solving problems in sewing or any creative activity you're doing, if you're doing working on your house or whatever you're doing. Gardening, whatever it is

Just practicing problem solving in itself builds so much confidence. So the first one is problem solving. The next one we wanted to talk about, which is related but different, is making mistakes.

Moment 2: Making Mistakes

Sarai
Making mistakes and learning how to fix them is actually really empowering, because every mistake that you make has a lesson—at least one lesson—embedded in it.

Making mistakes is really vital to building up your confidence. But I think it's probably of all of these five moments, we're going to talk about probably the most frustrating and difficult and the most easy to get wrapped up in and kind of tell yourself, well, I'll never master this or I'm always going to be making these kinds of mistakes.

Whatever story you tell yourself, I feel like this is the most difficult one for a lot of people. What do you think, Haley?

Haley
Yeah, I think mistakes are really powerful, because not only are we having to push through the discomfort of making the mistake, we're also going to have to probably introduce some problem-solving to overcome that mistake as well.

So we're getting the added value of that problem-solving plus learning a lesson for next time.

For example, if you decide to skip making a muslin and you go to try on your garment and you're like maybe finished, maybe 90% finished, and it just looks weird, of course you could just abandon the project. That is always an option I suppose. But if you want to figure it out, you're going to have to use your problem-solving to push through, to find a creative solution for making the garment wearable or to your own preferences.

But then you're also getting the added value of that lesson of, well, next time it is going to be worth it for me to spend two hours making a muslin and you know, making those pattern changes.

So I think that mistakes really pack a punch.

Sarai
Yeah, in more ways than one, metaphorically. And sometimes it feels like physically.

I think mistakes are probably the number one opportunity to build confidence, but they don't feel good. They're also the number one opportunity to destroy confidence.

So I feel like it really comes down so much to your mindset and the way you're willing to approach them, which is difficult. It's difficult in life, it's difficult in sewing to see mistakes that way.

So the next thing we wanted to talk about, so we've talked about problem-solving, we've talked about mistakes, the next one is repetition in your sewing.

Moment 3: Repeition

Sarai

So when you seek repetition in your sewing, you start to build the muscle memory of sewing. And repetition really gives you a lot more opportunities for wins, which helps to build confidence.

I think repetition is something that it depends on your mindset around sewing. It can be uncomfortable for some people who want to continue to experiment and try new things or do really challenging things. But sometimes repetition and just doing the same thing over and over again is the best path to confidence because it helps you to build that intuition we were talking about earlier.

Do you have any examples of this Haley, that might make it more concrete for people?

Haley
Yeah, when I taught in person sewing, I always recommended my students, if you take a class with me and you sew it with me, then go home and sew it yourself. That doesn't mean you need to be sewing it from the exact same fabric and making an exact replica of what you made with me. But you can always introduce new factors into that, a new fabric, hacking it. But I think that repetition is in sewing, you're going to be learning skills, but you're also learning the muscle memory that it takes to make the finished product.

You don't just need to build confidence in your knowledge, you need to build confidence in that muscle memory and your hand’s ability to do the task your brain is telling it to do. Repetition is where the physicality of sewing I think comes into play more.

Sarai
I totally agree. And it's interesting because I think a lot of people don't necessarily think about the physicality of sewing. They think about it as maybe something that goes on in their heads and not as a conversation between your body, specifically your hands, usually, and your brain.

I think that part gets neglected a lot, the bodily part of sewing. But I think it's a big part of why it's so enjoyable is because a lot of us get stuck in our heads a lot of the time. We are doing things throughout the day that are more cerebral and more about solving problems in your mind rather than with your hands.

Sewing offers this really amazing opportunity to use your body and your brain together. And I think repetition helps to build that connection and make you feel like you're capable of solving problems with your hands as well as with your brain, which is I think really valuable.

The next thing is learning.

Moment 4: Learning

Sarai

So when we talk about learning, we're talking about more formal learning because obviously you learn from all of these things that we've been discussing. But if you look for sewing classes either online or in person, it really helps to fast-track your learning, because especially if you're a beginner, the sooner you can get over that ultra beginner hump, that really challenging first few steps of becoming a sewer, the more likely you're going to be to succeed.

You've taught sewing for many years. What's your experience with this?

Haley
Yeah, I think that a lot of times I would have students that came into class and maybe they'd take machine basics kind of Sewing 101 class and I felt like there was always kind of like two groups of people who would leave that class. There was always like the group that was like, what should I do next? They wanted the training wheels.

And then there was the group that was in a really big hurry to go and make something a lot more complicated. And there's nothing wrong with either of these groups, but the success rate of the first group, the training wheels group, was always much higher.

Even though at first glance it might seem like that was the slow route, in my experience, I would find that those people would pick up sewing so much quicker than the people who were just kind of like off-roading on their own.

That's really challenging, having some kind of like sewing mentors and teachers along the way to help you, yeah, I'm going to say training wheels again, I think they're really great training wheels. If you really struggle with building confidence in yourself, then I would say that's my number one recommendation to you is trick yourself into it.

Sarai
Yeah, I think that raises a good point that there are some people who have so much natural confidence in certain areas. Like, you can have confidence in one area, not confidence in another area. And some people are even maybe overconfident about their abilities, which leads them to get frustrated.

But if you are somebody who knows that you struggle with confidence in this area or with skill-building generally, then getting that support can be really helpful.

If you're somebody who is maybe you know yourself to be a little bit overconfident and you know, you tend to burn out on things because you can't get them right away, then maybe you also would benefit from having somebody help you out. So I think that's a really good point about those two different kinds of people.

And then the last one we want to talk about, the last moment you can look for as an opportunity to build confidence, is the fun one: success.

Moment 5: Success

Sarai
Obviously not every project is going to be successful. But learning to find success, even if it's just successfully learning something new, maybe going back to the problem solving and mistakes, maybe you had success in figuring out that problem or fixing that mistake, or the success is just a new lesson.

Or it could be an overall success. Like I was talking about earlier when I said that looking back on those successful projects really helps me to build confidence. It could be any of those things.

Success isn't something to overlook when you're talking about learning and building confidence either. What do you think, Haley? Do you feel like success is something that people sometimes tend to in the sewing world at least tend to kind of discount? Because I see that a lot.

Haley
Yeah, I think so. I think that when we’re, especially in a world where we have windows into people's lives via social media, that's what we're seeing—we’re seeing their successes. We're not necessarily seeing like, the pile of unfinished projects in a basket and all of the mistakes that they learn they made along the way.

And so I'm here to say that I make mistakes all the time, so often, and that's what makes my successes even sweeter.

Sarai
Yeah, that's true. Without failure, success doesn't really mean that much. I think that's you always have to take the bad with the good because the bad defines the good. I totally agree with that.

I also think that in addition to only seeing other people's successes, maybe what I see in a lot of stores and even like, pre social media is just like an unwillingness to acknowledge that you did something well or that it turned out great. People look for the mistakes, I think, in their own work. And again, something that goes beyond sewing.

People just naturally see the things that didn't go exactly according to plan. They'll be tiny, tiny things, but for in their minds, it ruins the whole project. And I think that is a way you might be sabotaging your confidence if you're only looking at the bad and not looking at the good, because you're probably making some amazing stuff, and most people, especially people who don't, so would be so impressed by what you're doing. But in your own mind, it's just never good enough.

And I think that can really inhibit you because it's inhibiting your confidence and that's inhibiting your ability to do even more cool stuff.

Haley
When I find myself being really critical of myself, sometimes I like to think of like, what would tiny little girl Haley think of the things that I do now? Like, what would she think of, you know, the top that I made that I was disappointed in? She would probably think that it was like, badass. Feframing it from that perspective. Maybe it's because I live with a toddler and she think in this moment in time, I know this will change, she thinks everything I do is the most amazing.

And I'm like, I wish we all could have that perspective of ourselves a little bit more frequently. So look at yourself through little-you’s eyes and maybe you'll see more successes than you did at first glance.

Sarai
Yeah. That's so sweet. That's such a sweet way of framing it. And it's so true. I feel like the world can really grind us down as we get older and force us to look at all our mistakes and think about ourselves in such a critical way.

It's so valuable to be able to return to that more childlike aspect of ourselves where we're really interested in the creativity and the newness and just making cool stuff and having fun and not being so serious about everything all the time.

Haley
Totally.

Wow, we really dug into some really good stuff today.

Recap: 5 Moments to find confidence in your sewing

So, just to recap a little bit, Sarai made a really good analogy that building your confidence is like this staircase, and you have lots of opportunities to continue to ascend this particular endless staircase that might seem kind of scary, but it's chill, it's life.

And those five opportunities that we talked about are:


  • Problem-solving

  • Making mistakes and solving them, which kind of circles back to the problem solving bit

  • Repetition

  • Learning, seeking out those learning opportunities

  • And then also acknowledging and relishing our successes

Sari, what is your big takeaway from this episode?

Sarai
This is something that I was thinking about as we were talking a little bit. So one of the things that I do, I keep a journal. I'm big into journaling. And one of the things that I do in my journal is I try to keep kind of a running list of things I've learned, like lessons I've learned. And I do that every month and then I compile them or I go through them, at least at the end of the year, and it's such a cool activity for me. I love doing that.

But this is making me think that it would be helpful to actually either have a practice like that or incorporate into my practice the things that I learned from sewing. Even little things, which, those might not be like big life lessons necessarily, but having a way to kind of jot down, well, I made this mistake, but I learned this lesson, I'm not going to repeat that next time can be really helpful.

That's kind of my takeaway from this. What about you?

Haley
I mean, my big takeaway, I would say, is just more of a reflection on the work it takes to continue to build and cultivate that confidence, even though I consider myself a confident sewer.

The endless staircase metaphor, really, it sounds kind of like alarming, but it's really true that neglecting to cultivate that confidence continuously can have negative impacts on your sewing practice.

So just paying attention to those learning moments, seeking out opportunities to learn and try new things, and acknowledging all those successes, I think no matter how fabulous of a sewer you are, is something that we can all benefit from.

Sarai
Yeah, and I think the endless staircase metaphor, it can be alarming, but you can also think about it as maybe the staircase never ends, but you get stronger. You are getting better at managing the staircase, and it's becoming easier and easier over time, even though it's never really going to end. You're never going to get to the top.

Haley
And no one's saying you need to sprint to the top. You can take it at your own pace.

Well, if you are looking to build a little bit more confidence in your fitting—somewhere I feel really good about, but maybe you're like, I want some of that confidence, Haley, then you should definitely check out our Fit Journal.

Our Fit Journal walks you through a really simple fitting process that helps you kind of demystify getting the fit that you actually want. It includes worksheets for taking and comparing measurements, choosing your size and making adjustments.

And the cool thing is that when you use it over time, it really helps you to find your fit and build that confidence. It is available for free at here.

And if you liked this episode, you can leave us a review. We always love reading what you have to say. We read every single one of them. And it helps people like you who like to listen to us gab about sewing to find us and grow our listenership, which is great. The more people we can reach, the better. You can also find us on YouTube here.

Sarai and I have been working on a lot of fun stuff there, so definitely check it out. You can follow us on Instagram at Seamwork, and if you'd like to join Seamwork and become part of our private community, plus get access to hundreds of sewing patterns and dozens of sewing classes.

Podcast listeners get 50% off when they join at Seamark.com/go/podcast 50. That is a lifetime discount.

Sarai
Yeah. As long as you're ascending that staircase, you'll still have that discount.

All right, that does it for us this week. I'm Sarai.

Haley
And I'm Haley.

Sarai
And this is Seamwork Radio.


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