Seamwork
 

Seamwork Staff Makes


We know it helps to see finished examples of Seamwork patterns made in different fabrics …

Seamwork Staff Makes


We know it helps to see finished examples of Seamwork patterns made in different fabrics and on different body types. We’re lucky to work with very talented models every month, but if we also share our finished projects, you’ll get a better idea of how you can make the patterns fit your style and your body.

For the tenth year of Me-Made-May, and in celebration of this month’s patterns, the team sewed up our favorite basics from the Seamwork catalog. A basic can mean something different for everyone, so read on to see the different ways we all approach basics.

And don’t miss the feature in this month’s issue, In Defense of Basics, which will teach you new ways to rethink your basics.


Taylor’s Bo Top

What does a “basic” mean to you?

I think a basic is something that you can wear over and over and make it feel new and different each time if you want.

How do you feel when you wear your Bo top?

I feel comfortable (super important to me!) and sleek. It’s super simple, but the oversized silhouette helps me feel a little more glamorous. Plus, the fabric is silk, so it’s extra fancy.

Did you hack the pattern at all? If you were to hack it for your next version, what would you do?

Nope, it’s straight outta the “envelope.” If I were to hack it, I’d add some big fun sleeves to it, or I really loved the hack that @athreadthatbinds did. She added a fun little tie at the waist.

Size: I made a straight 16.

Measurements: 44” 36” 49” and I’m 5’7”.

Fabric: Silk Noil from Bolt Fabrics.

Haley’s Everly Skirt

What does a “basic” mean to you?

I think the word "basics" gets tossed around a lot when it comes to style and fashion. Especially in those articles about the basics you "have" to have in your closet. To me, a basic is something much more personal than that. Everyone knows that a white T-shirt goes with a lot of things, but I think that it is much more fun to think of basics less in terms of these standardized rules and more in terms of our individual style and the things we want to wear all the time—the things that bring us joy!

For me, a basic first and foremost has to make me feel really good because if it doesn’t, I won’t wear it, and that defeats the whole purpose. I ask myself, do I feel flattered by the silhouette and color? Am I physically comfortable?

The next most important quality is its versatility. Can I wear it with more than just a couple of garments in my closet? Could it work for multiple seasons? If the answer to these questions is yes, then in my book, it is a basic.

How do you feel when you wear your Everly skirt?

I love this Everly skirt because while the fit and color are basic, the animal-inspired print makes it feel special. I think that this unique quality makes it really fun to wear, whether it is with a fitted bodysuit or a graphic T-shirt.

Did you hack the pattern at all? If you were to hack it for your next version, what would you do?

Since this fabric is a twill, it isn’t a good candidate for cutting on the bias. Instead, I cut it on the straight of grain and opted to make it single layer. This made it so so easy and quick to sew.

If I were to make this again—I’m already dreaming of a red rayon linen blend skirt—I would make a bias-cut version because bias-cut garments are so dreamy.

Size: 12 graded to a 14 at the hips.

Measurements: 42", 33", 45” and I’m 5’2”.

Fabric: Tencel Twill from Blackbird Fabrics.



Wallis’s Ariane Bodysuit

What does a “basic” mean to you?

A good basic is a versatile garment that can be paired with many other garments I already have in my closet. Typically the design is on the simpler side, but not always! Sometimes it can just be made in a neutral color. It also helps if a basic garment can be layered to be worn all year round.

How do you feel when you wear your Ariane bodysuit?

It feels good to wear this bodysuit because it’s reliable, a good fit, not fussy, and versatile. I can wear it with skirts, pants, or under sheer dresses—what’s not to love?

Did you hack the pattern at all? If you were to hack it for your next version, what would you do?

I used stretch lace to hem the leg openings rather than fold-over elastic, so my bum doesn’t look lumpy under fitted garments.

Size: Size XS with extra 3/4” of ease added at the waist.

Measurements: 33, 27, 37 and I’m 5’ 4”.

Fabric: Some kind of mystery knit I found at Scrap years ago.

Sarai’s Margo Skirt

What does a “basic” mean to you?

I look for simple or classic shapes that can be made in versatile fabrics. I also look for comfort, because that’s a big deciding factor in how often I’ll wear something.

How do you feel when you wear your Margo skirt?

It’s super comfortable and easy to move around in! But it still has a feminine feel, since it’s clingy and has the little slits at the bottom. I feel comfortable but put together.

Did you hack the pattern at all? If you were to hack it for your next version, what would you do?

No hacks on this one! I think it could be fun to play with the slits, and maybe do a version with a back slit.

Size: Small

Measurements: 37”, 27.5", 38" and I’m 5’4”.

Fabric: Thick textured knit. It has a lot of spring and a spongy feel. I love this fabric!

Kathleen’s Shelly Leggings

What does a “basic” mean to you?

I think a basic is a garment that’s easy to make a part of your everyday style. Be it a pair of jeans that go with everything or a jacket with your face bedazzled on the back, what you are the most comfortable in is what you’re going to wear the most.

How do you feel when you wear your Shelly leggings?

When I wear my leggings, I am the most comfortable boss. Everyone loves them, and I love them more.

Did you hack the pattern at all? If you were to hack it for your next version, what would you do?

I didn’t do any major hacks. I did, however, put 3” elastic in the waistband.

Size: Large

Measurements: 38”, 33”, 44” and I’m 5’9”.

Fabric: Made from mystery office fabric. Likely a 4-way poly blend.

Chelsea’s Rory top and Everly skirt

What does a “basic” mean to you?

I tend to look for basics that are quick to sew up, that way I don’t get bogged down part way through and am less likely to finish that project! Obviously, comfort is super important, so I look for a basic that’s made for comfortable fabrics, or has ease in just the right spots, so I’m comfortable wearing it. Lately, I’ve really been needing to make more simple tops, thankfully the Rory top fits that bill for me!

For skirts, I like designs that aren’t fussy but still have an interesting detail. The Everly skirt is great for showing off a cute print or playing with contrast, thanks to the two layers. Also, being a quick and easy sew is important! Usually, waistbands are one of my least favorite parts of sewing a skirt, but since the Everly skirt uses bias binding, it’s so simple and quick.

How do you feel when you wear your Everly skirt and Rory top?

I’m so comfy! Even though it’s a simple top, the ties give it a cute detail, so it feels a little more ‘elevated’ than a typical T-shirt.

Did you hack the pattern at all? If you were to hack it for your next version, what would you do?

I didn’t hack this one since it was the first one I made, but there’s so much hacking ability with Rory. I would love to experiment with the tie, make it longer, move it to the front, etc.

For Everly, I did a contrast fabric for the underskirt and used a rolled hem for both layers. I could see playing with printed and solid fabric in the layers, or doing a fun contrast bias binding for the waistline!

Size: For the skirt, I made a size 8 graded to a 6 at the waist. For the top, I made a size 8 shortened by 2 1/2”.

Measurements: 37 1/2”, 29, 38 1/2” and I’m 5’ 2”.

Fabric: The top layer of the Everly skirt is a lightweight twill, and the bottom layer is chiffon. For the Rory top, I used a jersey knit from Art Gallery fabrics.

Download new patterns each month starting at $5.83

Use the techniques and ideas featured in each month’s issue to create these and other quick & lovely projects.

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