Seamwork
 

Staff Makes

Our stash-busting tips.

We know it helps to see finished examples of Seamwork patterns made in different fabrics and on different body types. We’re lucky to work with very talented models every month, but if we also share our finished projects, you’ll get a better idea of how you can make the patterns fit your style and your body.

This month, we sewed the new Clarke tank and Miller shorts from our stash. We all took a different approach—some of us wanted to get rid of small amounts of yardage, and some of us picked projects that fit a special fabric we’ve been storing. Keep reading to see how we busted our stashes, and join this stash-busting challenge in our community forums if you are up for busting your own stash this month.

Robin Loves Chambray and Ikat



What’s the story behind the fabric you found in your stash? Where did it come from and how long have you had it?

The silvery chambray I used for my Clarke tank is a mystery! I don’t know where I got it or even how many years it was in my stash. I can tell you that it washed up beautiful and soft, and I might have used it sooner had I pre-washed it before I put it away.

The black ikat I used for my Miller shorts I actually bought not that long ago from Merritt Makes (Seamworkers get a discount there!) not knowing at all what to make with it, just that I had to have it! It also washed up nice and soft and it drapes perfectly for these shorts.

Why did you pick this project for stash busting? What came first, the project or the stash-busted fabric?

When it came time to sew these ladies up, I dug through all my bins and drawers for fabric with just the right handfeel. I really love these two fabrics together, and I only had small amounts of each, so they worked out perfectly for these patterns. I did have to get VERY creative with the cutting layout for the Miller Shorts, but that is mostly because I lengthened them so much.

Do you have any stash-busting tips to share?

Pre-wash your fabric before adding it to your stash. It can change the feel and drape of the fabric which will help you envision it as a garment better.

Project Details:

For the Clarke tank, I made a straight size 4, no modifications. For the Miller Shorts, I made a size 4 blended to a 6 at the waist, adding 11" to the inseam. My measurements are 35”, 30 1/2”, 37" and I am 5’4”.

Chelsea Used Scraps



What’s the story behind the fabric you found in your stash? Where did it come from and how long have you had it?

All of my Clarke tanks used up scraps I had been holding onto for a couple years now—from past projects and scraps from friends. The facings for each tank were also scraps! My bee fabric was from a blouse I didn’t end up wearing too much, so I took it apart and had just enough for a Clarke tank!

Why did you pick this project for stash busting? What came first, the project or the stash-busted fabric?

I think for me it was the project! Knowing that it would take little fabric (having the pieces not cut on the fold really helped!) made me want to dig in my scrap box. I was surprised I already had enough scraps to make three tanks.

Do you have any stash-busting tips to share?

Look for projects that have a center front and center back seam, instead of being cut on fold! Also, it helps if it’s a sleeveless garment (or has very tiny sleeves), since those can eat up on yardage pretty fast. Also, consider color-blocking, playing around with different prints, or using two different fabrics for the front and back!

Project Details:

My Clarke tanks are all size 8, with 1/2” taken off the strap length. My Miller shorts are a size 8, with 2 1/2” taken from the rise. My measurements are 37 1/2”, 28”, 39” and I am 5’2”.

Haley Stashes Linen


What’s the story behind the fabric you found in your stash? Where did it come from and how long have you had it?

I used a linen blend to make my Clarke top. I have had this particular cut of fabric hanging out at my desk for quite a few months. I always knew it would be a perfect summer top, but after seeing the first few Clarke prototypes, I knew I had found "the one."

This fabric was Sarai’s originally—thanks, Sarai! She was cleaning out her stash, and I fell in love with it. I’m always a sucker for blue and white stripes.

Why did you pick this project for stash busting? What came first, the project or the stash-busted fabric?

When I designed Clarke I wanted to make the perfect swingy tank that would put all those small fabric cuts in my stash to use. And it has already helped me do just that, by turning a fabric I got for free with no plan in mind into something I’ll wear time and time again. I have already cut my second version!

Do you have any stash-busting tips to share?

For Clarke in particular, If you don’t have quite enough fabric, try cutting the facing from a contrasting fabric. The center front and back seams are perfect for color-blocking too, making it even easier to use up those scraps.

If you are looking to use up some of your smaller scraps, try cutting in-seam pockets or bias tape. You can stash these pre-cut goodies with your notions and use them in future projects!

Project Details:

I made a straight size 14. My measurements are 42", 33", 45" and I am 5’2".

Wallis Organizes Her Stash



What’s the story behind the fabric you found in your stash? Where did it come from and how long have you had it?

For Clarke, I used a rayon challis from Cali Fabrics (no longer in stock). I originally bought the fabric years ago to make a dress with bias facing and a button placket, but at the time my skills weren’t quite advanced enough to successfully finish the dress. I tried to alter the dress design to fit my skill level, it didn’t go well, and then I was stuck with leftover fabric. However, I think it worked out perfectly for Clarke.

The fabric I used for Miller came from the remnants section at Fabric Depot (R.I.P). It’s a Robert Kaufman dot chambray. It was either 3/4 or 7/8 of a yard, but with some very careful cutting I was able to fit the pattern on the fabric (I had to cut the ties on the crossgrain). If your fabric doesn’t have stretch, it’s OK to cut some pieces on the opposite grain (especially pieces like pockets and ties).

Do you have any stash-busting tips to share?

Organize your fabric! It has been such a game changer for my sewing, I organized fabrics left over from old projects that are about 1 yard, so it was easy for me to choose these fabrics. Get as specific as possible when organizing, I have bins labeled by knits, wovens, prints and solids in addition to the 1 yard sections.

Keep in mind you can typically get more out of your fabric if you don’t cut on the fold. Don’t be afraid to cut pockets or ties either on the crossgrain or out of a different fabric.

Project Details:

For Clarke, I made size 2 with no modifications. Next time, I would widen the straps a little.

For Miller, I made size 4 with the rise shortened by 2”. Next time, I would make the pockets out of a really lightweight lining fabric in addition to making the waistband a little taller to get a more dramatic paper bag look. My measurements are 33”, 27”, 37” and I am 5’4”.

To see more finished projects from the Seamwork team, head over to the Community and browse the projects forum!

Dexter
Chip
Bryn

Download new patterns each month starting at $5.83

Use the techniques and ideas featured in each month’s issue to create these and other quick & lovely projects.

Get Started