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Episode 107

Do You Have These 20 Essential Sewing Tools? (Part 2)

After reviewing the 10 most essential sewing tools last week, Sarai and Haley share 10 nice-to-have tools. These tools are by no means necessary, but they will save you time and effort—plus they’re fun to collect!

If you have the budget, these tools will lend you a hand while you sew (and even a clap!), so we recommend you add them to your sewing kit.

Podcast Transcript

Sarai
Welcome back to Seamwork Radio, where we share practical ideas for building a creative of process so you can sew with more intention and joy. So today we’re talking about 20 essential sewing tools, and we already talked about the first ten in episode one. So we talked about ten really basic essential tools, and then today we’re going to talk about the other ten, which are the more nice to have tools. S

So if you are somebody who maybe already has your sewing toolkit all set up, this is going to be a good opportunity for you to hear about ways that maybe you could upgrade the tools that you already have or maybe learn about some new variations or tools that you haven’t added to your collection yet. So today we’re all about those nice to haves and those kind of little extra things that make sewing a little bit more fun.

So our icebreaker for this episode is “what have you been sewing recently that’s been bringing you joy? Or making, it doesn’t have to be sewing” How about you, Haley?

Haley
Well, I’ll talk about what I’m sewing right now. I am making a Piqué dress, which is Christine Haynes, her new pattern. She’s one of my good friends and she emailed me the pattern, which is like, really good timing because my husband and I are currently planning a vacation, like a beachy vacay, and I wanted to make like, something kind of caftan-like to swan around in. And I have this amazing sheer fabric. It’s like a burnout gingham in a navy color, and so I’m making it out of that. And this pattern has a ton of ease, but it’s totally see through. I love the kind of like, juxtaposition of something that’s just like, enormous but also completely see through. So I’m like, trying to decide. I’ll definitely wear it as a beach cover up, but I’m like, am I brave enough? I think I am. The answer is yes. The answer is always yes to just do like, a brand half slip or something underneath. Going out to dinner? I think I am. I’ll go for it. I have not very many body hang ups, so I’m going to do it. And it’s like the coolest fabric that I bought tons of years ago because I just fell in love with it,

So it’s bringing me joy, one, because it’s my friend’s pattern and I love it and everyone should go buy it, and two, because I’m making it for a vacation and I haven’t gone on a proper vacation in six years.

Sarai
Oh, wow. That sounds awesome. That sounds like a really pretty, both the fabric and the end result sounds really pretty. And I love sheer things. I love the look. I wore a dress yesterday that’s actually what I was going to talk about something that I just made that is pretty sheer, and I wore it with a bra and a half slip, and it wasn’t probably not as sure as what you’re talking about, though. But yeah, there’s no shame in that. I felt pretty confident in it.

Haley
Yeah, I like to make the sewing a little make it sexy sometimes. Why not?

Sarai
Yeah, why not? Yeah. Mine is also sheer. I think. I’m actually going to do a YouTube video about this garment that I made. I might even do a couple of YouTube videos on it. But I made I turned our Mad top pattern into a dress, so I added a tiered skirt to the bottom of it. I made it in a rather sheer eyelet fabric. It’s a white cotton eyelet fabric. And I added the tiers to the bottom. And then I also added, like, a ladder lace insertion between the tiers, which looks really pretty, and it adds a little flash of skin. So I was wearing a half slip on it that’s like, the color of my skin, so it didn’t look like I was wearing anything underneath. It’s very, like, subtle, and I think it came out really pretty. And I think what makes me feel joyful about it is not just that the end result is really nice and I just love wearing long dresses, but also that I learned some new techniques that I think I might share in a YouTube video. It’s a pretty simple little technique, but for adding the lace insertion and finishing the edges so it looks really clean on the inside, and you don’t have a lot of especially with the sheer fabric, you don’t have the seam showing on the outside of the garment very much, and it looks really good.

So I’m really proud of that. So I was thinking about making a video about how to turn a top like that into a tiered dress and then also how to add insertions like that and finish the edges, which I think is really fun. It’s a really fun technique.

Haley
I can’t wait to see it.

Sarai
Yeah. I had Kenn take pictures of me in it yesterday, so I’m going to try and post them in the community today. I also have a backlog of pictures of things that I’ve made that I need to post. So I get this up today. I also made a Benning dress recently that’s really, like, a pretty you’ve seen it. It’s the cornflower.

Haley
I saw that one.

Sarai
Yeah. So I’m going to post that one too. I’ve been sewing a lot lately, and I love it. All right, so if you have an ice breaker for us for a future episode, you can share it. If you’re a Seamwork member, you just go to Seamwork.com/go/icebreakers, and that will take you to a thread in our community where you can share your ideas for an icebreaker that we’ll use on a future episode. We’d love to hear your questions. So check it out. Seamwork.com/go/icebreakers.

Alright, so we’ve already talked about the top ten real essential sewing tools that you need in your toolkit. So we talked about a bunch of those tools, and then we talked about the variations on those tools that we own and particularly like. So I’m just going to summarize real quick what those were, those top ten essentials, they are fabric shears, so a pair of shears that are specifically dedicated to fabric. And we talked about some favorite variations at different price points for those. Paper scissors. So a pair of scissors that’s just for paper pins and pincushion, and what you can use for your pins and what you can use for your pin cushion.

And some variations on those as well, depending on what you like, either the classic tomato or Haley prefers the magnetic pin cushion. We talked about seam rippers is another essential, and I talked about my knife seam ripper, which I do not like and want to go back to the classic pronged. So you’ll hear about some of the variations in seam rippers, clear ruler, either a quilting ruler or your standard 18 inch clear ruler, or both. Measuring tape, chalk, or another marking tool of your choice. Needles in various sizes and thread and different types of thread. And then finally your iron and your ironing board. And it’s funny, right before we hit record in the last episode, I talked about my iron and I couldn’t remember if the brand was Rowen. And then I realized right after we stopped recording, I turned around. It’s actually right behind me, so I could have been turned around and read it off the iron itself, but it’s Rowena. It is a Rowena iron. All right, so those are the essentials that we covered in the last episode. So today we’re going to talk about more of the nice to have sewing tools.

So the things that you might want to either add to your sewing toolkit or you might want to upgrade if you already have these things. So we’re going to go through them. This might be a little bit shorter episode today. And the first one that we’re going to talk about is something that Haley mentioned as being her favorite sewing tool in the last episode, which is a point turner. So Haley already talked about how much you love your point turner and all the different things that you use it for. Is there anything else that you want to add or you want to sum up for people who maybe didn’t hear the other episode?

Haley
I guess I’ll summarize. So I love using a point turner to encourage any kind of like rolled edge, like on a facing or something like that before I go to press it. I use my point turner to kind of encourage that role and to push my seams out so I don’t just use it for turning points and getting those nice and crisp, which is nice too. I also like to use it when I’m pressing a seam open or to the side to just in place of my fingers instead of finger pressing, using the hard surface of the point turner to do that instead. And I also really just like a bamboo point turner rather than a plastic one. They tend to have a little bit sharper point. So it’s something to be careful of, but I just love mine.

Sarai
Yeah. The other great thing about bamboo versus plastic well, I think one great thing about bamboo versus plastic, obviously, is that it’s not going to melt under your iron. If you need to really get in there and push out that point while you’re ironing, you can do that with a bamboo point turner. And bamboo is also a soft wood, so it is less likely to just like, puncture through your fabric. You can kind of gently push out the corners without worrying about it really stabbing your fabric because the wood is nice and soft. So I love my bamboo point turner. Yeah, that’s a great tool. And I think a lot of people will use other things that they have laying around to push out points, which also works. You can use like a knitting needle. There are bamboo knitting needles. So if you already have a bamboo knitting needle, that’s something you can use. But there are going to be a little point here. And the bamboo point turner, if you’re not familiar with what it looks like, it’s basically sort of elongated rectangle. And then it has a point on the end that is sharp and not too sharp and also has kind of like an edge to it, which helps you to really push out the corner very cleanly.

So it’s just made for the job and works super well. So if that’s something you don’t have in your toolkit and they’re not expensive at all.

Haley
Yeah, I think they’re like $5. And I like the point turner because it has a blunt edge and the pointed edge and the blunt edge you can use for the finger pressing and turning edges over and things like that. So a little bit superior to like, say anything needle or I know some people use chopsticks or something like that because it’s a little more multi use.

Sarai
Yeah, it’s nice for a little hard to describe, but if you’ve got like a 90 degree angle you’re pushing out, you can kind of use the edge of that point to push out the side, one of the sides, while you push out the corner, if that makes sense. So it’s just really made for the job. All right, so number one was a point turner. And number two, this is something I do not own. Number two is a bodkin. Do you have a bodkin?

Haley
Yeah, I like the little ones that are like the little basically, they look like tweezers with a little ring to fasten them. I do use a bodkin rather than a safety pin because wait, before you.

Sarai
Finish, you want to describe what a bodkin is used for in case people don’t know the term.

Haley
Totally. So bodkin is used for threading things through casing, so elastic or draw strings. So what you do is a lot of people use a safety pin because it’s really accessible. Most people have a safety pin laying around. There’s a few different variations on them. But the one that I like to use is, like, looks like kind of like tweezers with a little teeth on the end, and there’s a ring that you use to kind of, like, close the teeth. And the reason I like a bodkin more than a safety pin is if you’ve ever had a safety pin come undone in the middle of a casing, it is so annoying to take out. If bodkin comes undone, you just wiggle it out. It’s no big deal. But I really do like a podcast. You can also use bodkins for turning tubes. It’s one of those things that’s like a 99 cent tool. But I think that it’s such an upgrade to a safety pin.

Sarai
All right, well, maybe I should get one. I always use a safety pen, and it works, but a bodkin is definitely the superior tool. And you’re right, it’s cheap. It’s cheap. I should probably just pick one up.

Haley
It’s cheap and it’s small. And the other thing about a safety pin is that the head on safety pins have those kind of, like they have, like, more grooves and kind of edges for things to get caught on. So sometimes the safety pin can kind of work against you and make it hard to get past the seam, where a bodkin is, like, a little bit more streamlined to get into, like, the nooks and crannies of your casing.

Sarai
Yeah, I kind of wish I’d had one when I finished that Madhu neckline and sleeves, which they have an elastic casing. If you’re not familiar with the pattern, it’s sort of like a peasant style top with elastic in the neckline and elastic in the sleeves. And so there’s a lot of threading elastic involved. And I did have that problem with safety pin and trying to get it through all those little seams, and I kind of have to wiggle it under and over all the seam allowances, and it can be a little annoying. All right, I’m growing my list for my next fabric store run, so I know I need a new seam ripper, and I know I need a bodkin. Okay, so that’s number two.

Number three this is one of my personal favorites, actually. Number three and number four go together. Number three is a rotary cutter, and number four is a cutting mat. So rotary cutter and a cutting mat are something that you would use together. And if you don’t have a rotary cutter, if you use your fabric shears to cut your fabric, then that’s totally fine. That’s another great way to do it.

Sarai
A rotary cutter is going to be faster, though. It’s going to really speed up your cutting time. So I always use a rotary cutter to cut out my patterns. These days. I’m a big fan of the rotary cutter, and you can also get different blades. Haley mentioned in the last episode that you can get a pinking blade for your rotary cutter so that you can actually pink your seams as you cut, which is kind of neat depending on what kind of fabric you’re using. So a rotary cutter and a cutting mat are definitely must haves for me, I think the thing with the cutting mat is deciding what size you need. Do you have a big cutting mat Haley, for yours?

Haley
Yes, I do. I actually have two cutting mats, and both of them are 24 x 36, and I just stack them next to each other when I’m cutting because it feels like everyone knows cutting is not my favorite part. So anything I can do to make it simpler, faster, more enjoyable, I’m all about it.

Sarai
Yeah, I have two cutting mats as well, and actually, I inherited them with our house, which is very strange. But I’ve mentioned before that the person who owned this house before was a big quilter, and she left me a bunch of cool sewing related things. And one of the things was the cutting table I have and a cutting mat, which fits perfectly on top of the cutting table, so that’s what I use. And it’s a nice big cutting mat. And then I have a smaller cutting mat that’s stacked up over here, which I think is, like looks like it’s about 22 x 16 inches. So a little bit smaller cutting that. And that can be used for just cutting small pieces when I don’t want to drag out the huge cutting mat. So it’s kind of nice to have the two sizes. I’ve never had two sizes of mats before, but it’s actually kind of handy. I imagine if you’re quilting, it would be especially handy. But I’m actually planning to make a quote in the near future, so maybe I’ll have a chance to use both mats a lot more. But I really like having a large mat that you can fit your fabric on when you’re cutting and make sure that it’s at least wide enough to accommodate folded fabric in a variety of sizes.

So that would be something that’s probably about, I don’t know what, 36 inches wide would accommodate pretty much every fabric folded in half. So that’s probably a good place to start.

Haley
Now that I think about it, I do think that both of my cutting mats are 36 x 48. They’re big. I’m just like, give me the big boys. Take my money and give me the big cutting mats.

Sarai
Yeah, they can be expensive. They are an investment to get a cutting mat. So that’s something to be aware of. But if you feel like you’re ready for an upgrade, I think they’re very much worth it. I bought my first cutting mat, a really large cutting mat on ebay, actually. I don’t know if you can find them on ebay these days. That was a long, long time ago. I’m sure they have them on ebay, which saved quite a bit of money. And I used that for years. It was just a self healing cutting that really, really big. Even bigger probably, than the one I have right now. So that could be a good way to go if money is an issue. But you do want to start using a rotary cutter instead of shears for cutting.

All right, so that was number three and number four, the rotary cutter and cutting that. And now we’re going to get into some pressing tools, which are our favorite. So the next one is a pressing ham. So pressing ham, if you’re not familiar with it, is shaped like a ham. It’s like a kind of sort of soft, triangle shaped thing, very sturdy.

It’s very sort of heavy. And it’s filled I don’t know, what is it filled with? Is it filled with, like, sand or some sawdust? Sawdust, okay, I see. Yeah. It’s very, like, compact. And the shape of it really helps you to press a variety of curves. So if you’re doing small curves like sleeve cap, you can very easily fit it over the ham much easier than you can if you’re just using an ironing board and you’re just trying to press a curved seam on a flat surface. If you’ve ever tried to do that, it can be kind of fiddly. So pressing ham will let you press in a curved shape, which is just really helpful, and I’ll help you get that nice shape to it. Do you have anything to add about a ham, Hailey?

Haley
I mean, a ham just will enhance your ironing in general, even when you’re ironing a shirt for yourself. I know my husband, twice a year, he irons something for himself. He’s like, Where’s that round thing? The hem? Yeah. I just think that they’re so useful. I love them for pressing sleeve caps. Just get the best sleeve caps with them.

Sarai
Yeah, that’s probably what I use it for the most, is for sleeve caps. Which brings us to our next pressing tool, which is for a similar purpose, which is a seam roll. And a seam roll is like a pressing ham in that it is, I guess, filled with sawdust. It’s filled with the same stuff that the pressing ham is, and it’s more of an oblong shape, so it’s just kind of a long roll. And you can use that for pressing seams. So if you have any kind of seam that you’re pressing if you place it on the seam roll. Because the seam roll is round, it allows the seam allowance to fall away from the actual seam line so that when you press the seam, you don’t press the edges of the seam allowance into your fabric and create those ridges on the outside of your fabric that kind of show your seam through on the right side of your garment. So seam roll is great for that. It really helps to have a really nice iron that has a point on it to do that. So I mentioned the Rowenta iron that I have has a point on it, so you can really get into that seam without pressing down onto the whole seam allowance.

So those two things in concert work really well. And the other great thing about a seam roll is that you can insert it into things that are tube shaped, like a sleeve and it makes it easier. So it’s almost like, you know, a sleeve board or something like that. You can just kind of have something inside your sleeve to press against without pressing the whole sleeve flat on your ironing board. So I love a seam roll. I use that a lot.

Okay, so our next pressing tool is a clapper. A clapper is a really nice tool to have. This is actually another one that I don’t have at home yet. We have one in the studio, and I can use it there, but I haven’t picked one up for my house yet, and that is definitely next on my list. So a clapper is how would you describe the way it looks, Haley? It’s kind of a funky looking thing.

Haley
Yeah. Well, it’s a piece of wood, and it is flat on either side, and it’s kind of like oblong shape. So you use it to after you press something, you place the clapper on top of it to kind of, like, encourage whatever you’re pressing. I always think about it, like, if you curl your hair and then you put it in curlers to set the curl. The clapper is the same for fabric, except it’s getting those seams or whatever you’re pressing, or like a turned edge really, really crisp. I also don’t have a clapper at home. I use my bare hands to do this, and I don’t advise it. It’s probably why I have, like, lobster claws, as I’m always pressing something and then smashing my hand on top of it and grimacing through the pain.

Sarai
Yes. I was going to ask why you have lobster claws for hands. I didn’t want to say anything, but yeah.

So if you’re pressing a fabric that is difficult to press in anyway, like, let’s say you’re pressing a pair of jeans, and so it’s a really heavy fabric. It might take a lot of pressure to really get a good seam on it, but you don’t want to hold your iron there for 30 seconds, because it’s going to burn the fabric if you hold your iron on there for 30 seconds. So what you do is you put the iron on there. You maybe apply some steam. So you’ve got the heat and the steam going. And then you remove the iron and you replace it with the clapper. And you apply a lot of pressure with the clapper. And you can hold it there with pressure for as long as you want to. And the steam and the heat get trapped in there. So it’s like using an iron, but it’s not going to burn your fabric. So it adds the ability to press steam for a really long period of time without hurting your fabric with the iron.

So it’s a really nice tool. If you’re doing a lot of work with wool, for example, if you’re doing, like, a tailored garment, it’s great to have a clapper for making, like, a tailored wool coat or something like that, where you want to get a really crisp scene, but you don’t want to hold your iron there for too long. Also great for denim, for really heavy fabrics, it’s just anywhere you want to apply a lot of pressure on your seam to get a crisp edge. So I do recommend it. I don’t have one myself quite yet, but that’s why it’s a nice to have and not essential. But we do have one at work, and I’ve used it plenty there. All right, so that was number seven.

Number eight is upgraded marking tools. We’ve talked about this a little bit in the last episode. We talked about some of our favorite marketing tools, but if you don’t have marketing tools that you absolutely love, then maybe it’s time to upgrade and think about some tools that will do a better job for you. So we already talked about the ones we like. Is there anything you want to add to that, Haley?

Haley
No, just that, really. I am very keen on something that’s water soluble. I’ve been burned too many times by, like, triangle chalk not coming out. In most cases, it washes away, but sometimes you can really just get into the fibers of what you’re working on. So it’s worth to me a little extra money to get the water soluble varieties so that I don’t accidentally ruin something, because that’s just the worst feeling.

Sarai
Yeah, that’s definitely true. Nothing is worse than not being able to get those marks out of your fabric. So we mentioned a couple of favorites in the last one. Just to recap, if you didn’t get a chance to hear that, or if you don’t remember, we mentioned the chocolate pens from Clover. We mentioned the regular just kind of chalk squares that you can buy, which are also helpful. I really like to use those for wool. Again, if you’re doing more tailoring, they’re great for that. And then my personal favorite are the clover pencils. I guess I don’t know if they have a name besides just the pencils, but they come in a pack of three usually, and you get two colors per pencil, one on each end. And I just find those work really well on almost every fabric. So those are the ones that I use the most often. And the chocolate is really nice, too. I do like the chocolate. All right, so I was number eight.

Number nine. This is an extensive subject and one that I think is really fun, which is specialty presser feet. I think a lot of people, when they’re new to sewing, I know at least this was the case for me.

They have no idea how to use all the different feet that come with their machine. I remember when I got my first sewing machine, I was like, what are all of these things? I’m going to put them in a box and never look at them again. But once you understand all the things you can do with specialty pressure fee, you will fall in love. So that’s another area. This is a rich area for you to research, because if there’s something that you want to be able to do with your sewing machine, there might be a foot for it that’s going to make the job a whole lot easier. Do you have any favorite feet, Haley?

Haley
I would say my quarter inch foot, which is a it looks like a standard presser foot, but it has a little guide on the right side that allows you to sew at a perfect quarter inch seam allowance. And I love that one. I also have a rolled hem foot that I really like because rolled hems are annoying, and on the few occasions that I want to make them, I like having a little trick up my sleeve.

Sarai
Yeah, that’s a good one. I think my favorites, the ones that I use the most are probably first the edge stitch foot. Really helpful tool. You can get away without it. You don’t need an edge stitch foot to do edge stitching. If you’re, you know, you’ve got pretty steady hands and good hand eye coordination, you can definitely eyeball it and it’ll look great. You can just edge stitch with your regular straight stitch foot, but the edge stitch foot just really helps you to get that even stitching that’s close to the edge and not have to concentrate on it quite so much. So I use edge stitch foot a lot. Another one that I use a lot is the invisible zipper foot. It’s just so helpful. I love invisible zippers. I will always use an invisible zipper if I can. Instead of a regular zipper, you can’t always use it. If you’re using, for example, a really heavy fabric, it’s probably not going to zip over seams all that well. But I almost always put an invisible zipper when I’m making dresses or skirts or anything like that. And so I use. That foot a lot makes it really, really easy to put in a zipper, which I know is a pain point for a lot of people.

And then the last one that I use a lot is the automatic button hole foot. Not every machine will have something like this. If your machine does, I saw with a BERNINA is known for having a huge, huge array of pressure feet and really, really high quality ones. The automatic buttonhole foot just makes it total breeze to put in buttonholes, which, again, is a pain point for a lot of people. So it kind of goes back to if you’re having trouble with something, maybe you just need a different tool in order to do it. So, those are my favorites.

The last thing on our list, our last nice to have, is a trimming tool. So we’ve already talked about fabric shears, but another kind of scissoring tool that you may or may not have or you may want to think about upgrading is a specific tool just for trimming. So that could be a pair of short shears, or it could be a pair of thread snips that are just made for cutting thread off your fabric of your finished seams. So I use those a whole lot. What kind of trimming tools do you use, Haley?

Haley
My favorite are, I believe that their fiscal brand, their three or four inch trimming scissors. They look kind of like pruning shears. I love them. They have the sharpest little point to them. It’s also what we use in the office, and they’re pretty cheap. I think they’re like $15, and they’re so sharp, and they’ve lasted me forever. I love them.

Sarai
Yeah, I have a pair of those, too. I really like them because they’re sharp, and you can get very, very close to the end of the thread and cut it really, really short. So I love those, as well. The only thing I do not love about them is that when you’re not using them, they’re open. So you can’t necessarily, like I like to wear them around my neck. I like to wear a pair of snips around my neck on a ribbon so that they’re always at hand when I need them. And you can’t really do that with those because they are extremely sharp, and it would be very dangerous to have this very sharp thing on your chest. So that’s the only thing that I don’t necessarily love about them, which is not a problem with them, per se. It’s just they’re not suited to that. So I have those. I also have a pair of just short shoes. I believe they are gold star thread snaps, which are more like a tiny pair of scissors. And those can be worn around the neck, so I’ll use both. But it’s nice to have something that’s just made for cutting off threads and for doing those little trimming tasks.

Haley
Definitely.

Sarai
All right. Wow. We got through a lot today.

Haley
Yeah. That was quite the extensive list. So I’m going to just run through them one more time to recap are nice to have items. And these, once again, are the items that you by no means absolutely need to sew. But they’re the ones that if you’ve been sewing for a while. Or if these tools solve kind of a pain point for you and your sewing. You might want to think about investing in. Number one is a point turner. Sarah and I both really like the bamboo point turners. Number two is a bodkin. If you’ve been burned by a safety pin, try a bodkin. But I just wrote the copy for their packaging. They should hire me for that. All right, the next two, number three and number four are rotary cutter and rotary mat, which are kind of coming up here. You kind of need one to use the other. Next up, we have our pressing tools that, as you all know, Sarai and I are just so enthusiastic about. Number five is a pressing ham, six is a seam roll, and seven is a clapper. Number eight is think about making an upgrade in your marketing tools.

Maybe in addition to your chalk, triangles or squares, you might want to look for something that’s water soluble. Try a pen or a pencil. Makes it a little bit lots of times those are water soluble, and it’s going to make it a lot easier to get those markings out. You have to sit there with a wet rag, scrubbing away at your garments. Number nine is get some specialty presser feet. Most machines come with a few kind of general feet, and oftentimes, especially if you have a machine like a BERNINA, which is just famous for this, there are a ton of specialty feet out there that you can explore, from invisible zipper feet to guided feet, like an edge stitching foot or a quarter inch foot. All of these are really great. So with presser feet, I would definitely think about what in your sewing is difficult for you. If you really have a hard time with edge stitching, then maybe an edge stitching foot is great for you. And lastly, number ten is getting an upgraded trimming tool. Those cute little storks are great. Or if you’re using your fabric shears to trim your thread and your seam allowance, you might want to get something that’s a little bit more specialized for the job that is going to make clipping those corners and grading those seams a lot easier for you.

Haley
I think that my big takeaway from this episode is that I need a clapper so that I can stop burning my hands and participating in some sort of weird, sick pain tolerance test every time I’m sewing with denim or wool.

Sarai
And slowly watch your hands morph back into human hands.

Haley
Yeah, I got to get rid of these lobster claws, man.

Sarai
They’re just not efficient. No, it’s nice having closable thumbs.

Haley
Worst sewing tool ever.

Sarai
Well, I think for me, my big takeaway is really similar to yours. I really need to make a list of some of these nice to have and start working off of it because I kind of feel like these are things that are easy to forget but will actually help my sewing quite a bit. But when you’re not using them, you’re just not thinking about them. So I need to start a little bit of a list of my nice to have and my upgrades and start kind of slowly working off of that.

Haley
I agree. I’m with you. Maybe we need to make a trip to the fabric store next time you’re in the office.

Sarai
Let’s go. Let’s go. Anytime.

Haley
Well, if you want to learn more about this, I definitely recommend listening to our last episode on the Ten Essential Sewing Tools that you need to Sew if you haven’t already. It’s a great episode and a lot of the content from this episode will probably make a little more sense if you go back and you listen to that one first or last if you’re listening to this now. Anyhow, I also recommend going on over to YouTube and checking out a great little video that we did about the five best pressing tools. As you know, we here at Seamwork are just so enthusiastic about pressing and pressing tools. So we made a little list of the five pressing tools we think you really need. And if you just can’t get enough info about sewing tools and equipment, then you should definitely check out the guide to sewing tools and equipment that we are putting together. It should be available by the time this episode airs, so we’ll pop that into the show notes for you. And if you like this episode, we would just love it if you would leave us a review. It helps other people to find us and it also helps us to know that we’re on the right track.

Haley
We’re making the stuff that you like. Here is a review from Fit Driver and they wrote, “look forward each week to your podcast coming out. I often listen while I’m sewing. Your voices are so soothing and your topics are always relevant. Thank you for your hard work.” That is so nice and I’m so glad that our voices are soothing.

Sarai
Maybe we should start like an ASMR sewing channel.

Haley
I would love that.

Sarai
I don’t know if my voice is that soothing.

Haley
I don’t know about that, but I kind of do like whispering and I’m good at making weird mic noises. Sarai gets to witness them when I set up my mic.

Sarai
Well, we’ll put that on the someday maybe list.

Haley
Yeah, I’m into it. We’ll try. If you don’t already. You can also follow us on a whole bunch of other platforms. You can follow us on YouTube at Seamwork Video. You can follow us on instagram at Seamwork, and if you’d like to join them and become part of our private community, plus get access to hundreds of sewing patterns and dozens of so long classes, podcast listeners get 50% off a lifetime discount when you join at Seamwork.com/go/podcast 50, that is Seamless.com Gopodcast 50.

Sarai
Awesome. Well, I want to just thank everybody for listening. We really, really appreciate you, and it’s so nice to hear from you. So whether you leave a review or you reach out to us on the community or through social media, we just really appreciate the feedback we’ve been getting, and it’s a joy to talk to you all this way every single week. So thank you so much. And that’s it for this week. We’ll see you next week. I’m Sarai.

Haley
And I’m Haley.

Sarai
And this is Seamwork Radio.

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