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Episode 99

Why Your Clothes Look "Homemade"

We often get asked how to help clothes look less "homemade," but what's the stigma behind homemade? In this episode, we explore that and share some tips for making your clothes look polished.

What really is the difference between handmade and homemade? Clothes are always made by people. Everything is handmade. The only difference is in execution—is it being produced in a factory or by you, at home?

Sarai and Haley share their tips for making your handmade clothes look as polished as possible.

Podcast Transcript

Sarai
Welcome back to Seamwork Radio, where we share practical ideas for building a creative process so you can find more joy in sewing. Today we’re talking about why you might feel that your clothes look homemade and what you can do about it. We’re going to cover why there’s such a stigma around homemade, eight sewing tips for making your clothing look more polished, and how to analyze ready to wear to get that look.

Alright, so we’re going to start with our ice breaker today, which is from Emma. And Emma says, “how has your sewing evolved since the beginning? Most people are aware of the party dress phase, but some people go straight into super wearable classics. Sewing is like a choose your own adventure.”

Haley
Wow.

Sarai
Okay. How has your sewing evolved since beginning? What do you think? Hailey, how’s your sewing evolved?

Haley
Well, I’ve been sewing for long enough that I have gone through so many different phases of my personal style, but also just the things that I like to sew. I think I’ll maybe just share a couple that I thought were more notable sewing phases in the beginning.

When I first started sewing, I was in school aspiring to be a fashion designer. So everything was kind of more like high concept, like, thought. I was so fancy pants. When I started sewing for myself, I really liked making fun clothes. I’m petite and curvy, and I couldn’t find I could find basics, but I couldn’t find fun things in the stores. It was kind of campy. I just sold a lot of weird campy stuff, and then I went through, like, a solid year phase after that where I was like, my wardrobe is totally bananas now. I got to make some wearable stuff. And then I went through, like, a hard knit phase, just so many knits. I think that now I’ve taken lessons from all of these different phases, and I like to think that I found a little bit more balance. Like, I know when to bring the fun, when to bring the camp, when to bring the basics, when to spice it up, that kind of stuff.

So I think that these sewing phases are really valuable in your personal style, evolution in your sewing journey. So I say go for it. If you’re having a frosting phase, just lean into it, have fun with it.

Sarai
Totally like you. I’ve been sewing a really long time, so I was in high school when I started sewing, and campy is a good word to describe it. My style was weird. I was just sewing weird stuff that I couldn’t find in stores. I was, I think, like, 16 or 17 when I started sewing. I wanted to buy, like, all the cool club wear that they sold on Melrose Avenue and couldn’t afford and just weird, weird stuff. And so that’s the kind of stuff that I wanted to sew. And I kind of started with that stuff which I would wear to high school. It’s just weird is the only way to describe it. And then I think in college I also wore a lot of weird stuff because I used to go out to a lot of clubs and just have a lot of fun in college and wore crazy stuff. And I also like to make costumes and things like that. And I was really into historical costuming, not for any particular purpose or reason. I just really liked learning about it and making cool, interesting things and learning all the techniques and the special fabrics and special notions and all that.

So that was a really big learning phase for me, where I still was making weird non wearable things, but I don’t think it has to be wearable for you to enjoy it and really learn a lot from it. So that was kind of my early experience with sewing. And then I think as I’ve gotten older, I tend to make more and more practical things and they have to kind of fit into my life. And I think part of that is learning is still important to me. But I’ve learned a lot of the basics of sewing, and so now those are more like special projects. And when I sew it, I really enjoy making things that are going to be useful in my life for the most part. Not totally, but for the most part now. So, yeah, it’s interesting to think about that evolution.

Haley
I think that early on, too, a lot of your sewing is for me at least, was very motivated by like I wonder if a lot of the experimentation came from that place. I wonder if I could sew this weird fabric into a dress or whatever. And now I still wonder, but not quite as much. I have a lot more experience under my belt so that I have a lot better idea of outcomes so I don’t feel as compelled to go crazy.

Sarai
Yeah, that’s a good way to put it, because when I was in college, I went to college in New York, so I lived in New York City at the time, and my friend and I would go to the garment district and all the little shops in the garment district and get fabric, and you could find some really cool, really interesting, weird, rainbowy, sparkly, crazy fabrics. And I remember finding all these really cool brocades and things like that that are just amazing in and of themselves and so wanting to sew with those really crazy special fabrics, I think it was a big motivator for me back then and just having fun with it. And I still like to have fun with my sewing and make things that are fun. So I think that part has stayed the same, but I think that what if question that you just said. I think that’s not so much a factor for me anymore. I kind of got better at visualizing the what if?

Well, thank you for that question, Emma. If you have an icebreaker for us for a future episode, you can leave it for us. If you’re a member, you just go to seamwork.com/go/icebreakers, and that will take you right to the forum thread on our community where you can share your ice breaker with us that we can use on a future episode. So thanks again, Emma.

Haley
So I am going to jump straight into kind of the topic of discussion today. We get the question a lot from Seamwork members, from listeners, the podcast all over the place. They ask, how can I make my clothes look less homemade? And I always think this is a really interesting question. There’s nothing wrong with something being homemade. I think it kind of calls out a very interesting stigma around this word, which we’re going to get into a little bit. And I think what most people mean is, how can I make clothing that looks more polished or maybe like a little less crafty if that’s not the look they’re going for? Not everyone has this goal, or you may not have this goal necessarily all of the time, but I think it’s kind of good to have some tools up your sleeve for when you don’t want to achieve that more crafty look, when you want something that feels a little bit more polished, which is what we’re going to be getting into today. So I’m curious. Is avoiding a homemade look the goal that you have in your personal sewing?

Sarai
That’s an interesting question because I would say no, and that’s because it’s not something I really consciously think about. I don’t really think about whether something’s going to look homemade or like I bought it in the store, but I do want it to look or feel special. I want it to feel like I put time into it and then I didn’t cut any corners or try to make it as quickly as possible. I want it to feel special and meaningful to me. And I think part of that is the amount of time that I’ve put into it, the amount of thought that I’ve put into it. So I would say that’s more my goal than having something that does not look homemade. But on the other hand, I think earlier on, we just talked about kind of like the phases we go through. I think earlier on, that might have been more the goal to learn how to make things that don’t look like they were made in a home at class, they say on Project Runway or whatever.

Haley
Sure. Yeah, definitely.

Sarai
That’s changed. What do you think? How do you feel about it?

Haley
Yeah, I think that you kind of summarized exactly how I feel early on. That was definitely a little bit more of my goal, is I wanted things to look I was very concerned with things looking professional. I’m using air quotes for that. But now I think that my focus has shifted more to how am I going to honor my time and my craft and my materials by making something that I feel proud of? And sometimes that could be something like something like patchwork, in which case the goal is to look kind of crafty sometimes that’s to make, like, a really sharp collared shirt. And so I think it just kind of depends on the project. I just want it to feel special and feel well made more than anything.

Sarai
Yeah. So why do you think there’s such a stigma around this term homemade or around things that look homemade, especially clothing?

Haley
I think that we could probably trace it back to our mother’s and grandmother’s generation a bit. Back in the day, sewing your own clothing was a more economical option, and going and buying clothes in a store was like, more fashionable one. I think that there’s still a little bit of that like a leftover stigma from past generations that homemade is less fashionable. I also think that homemade is nonconforming and there is like a safety in conforming your kind of uniform with the people around you. And I think that it can be maybe a little uncomfortable for people. I know it’s uncomfortable for people to stick out, and I think that those are the two big things. And then within the sewing community, I think that there can be like a little bit of snarkiness, a little bit of gatekeeping around whether or not things seem professional or not.

Sarai
Yeah, that might be true. I think you’re right. I think there’s a little bit of a class thing when it comes to whether clothing has been made at home or whether it’s something that’s purchased in a store, even though it’s so less out of economic necessity these days when fast fashion is so cheap, but it’s often cheaper to buy clothing in a store. And you might not have that stigma around something that you bought at H and M, even if it costs very little money. So it’s interesting that it’s not really tied to how much money you spend anymore, but there’s still kind of a lingering stigma around it, I think. Also there’s a little bit of snobbishness about crafts in general and people who do crafts and things being considered crafty. I feel this as somebody who owns a craft oriented business. When I tell people about my business, they automatically think it’s like a tiny Etsy shop or something like that. There’s just this sort of like, I don’t know, snobbishness about it. And some of that might be related to gender. And this being like a highly gendered activity in our society, it’s not as cool as, like, making your own furniture or some other sorts of handcrafts.

So that’s something I’m always thinking about, and I think it’s a really interesting phenomenon that I think crosses over into this question of whether our clothes look homemade or not. Just the general stigma around craft.

Haley
Yeah, definitely. It really fires me up the way people look down their nose at it, as if having an Etsy shop and being a small business owner and just, being a one man show in itself, I mean, even that, I think is admirable. That’s amazing that if you could make a living for yourself, support yourself that way, do something that you love, people looking down their nose at it kind of on any level is ridiculous. I could go on and on. Yeah.

Sarai
I didn’t mean to imply there’s something wrong with you having an Etsy shop.

Haley
Yeah, totally.

Sarai
I meant more that people make assumptions and they assume that anything related to craft is the same, basically is, like, of that scale.

Haley
Sure, I’ve gotten people saying, oh, that’s cute often.

Sarai
Yeah, that sort of thing. They shouldn’t be saying about any professional activity, but anyway, right. Those are all really good reasons why there’s a stigma. And I think that also kind of, like, brings up the question of whether that’s really even something that we should be and we need to be thinking about or maybe there’s other ways of looking at it. Just something to examine, I guess, our own kind of, like, internal stigmas that we have. Is any projects that you’ve made come to mind about things that you feel like had that homemade look and how did you feel about them?

Haley
Well, back in a different time and phase in my sewing, I think that I was really into that homemade look, and I think it was this kind of like, middle finger in my early 20s. I’m like, I’m going to show the patriarchy and all of that stuff. I was really into just, like, making this really, like, kind of things that looked very homemade. Things made out of curtains, things with, like, funky ice tape or rick rack or that kind of thing. And wearing things like that all of the time. And then my goal was very much, let’s look crafty at that point in time. My dream job is, like, I want Amy Sedaris to hire me as her assistant, and I want to write tutorials for ridiculous crafts and things like a corsage made out of sausages, of course, sausage. I don’t know. I was very much into making things that are crafty and still sometimes that is my goal. Sometimes I think that it’s really fun to honor kind of the roots and the traditions of the craft of sewing by doing, like, having a little nod to that.

I think patchwork, different kinds of needlework, are amazing examples of how you can take something that’s crafty and, not that it needs to be elevated, it’s elevated on its own, but really honor it and show it off.

Sarai
I think that kind of brings up an interesting point, which is sort of the difference between the terms like homemade versus handmade versus artisanal. Artisanal is such a funny word. I feel like those are all the same, but different. And I feel like a lot of things that I have made that have been really special do have a handmade look to them because there are things that can’t be done quickly. They can’t be done in a manufacturing environment. Things that have maybe some hand done embroidery on them or they have a hand rolled hem or something like that that is not easy to do or can’t be done at all in more of a high paced production environment. So I think it’s interesting that there are these different terms that mean the same thing, but maybe they don’t. So I don’t know. What do you think?

Haley
Yeah, if I were to take a guess at what I think people would identify as the core difference between homemade and handmade is probably just execution because everything is handmade. Like all pieces of clothing are handmade. So I think that that’s just a matter of execution. I think artisanal is just like a buzzword that we can put on the jar of marinara sauce at the grocery store and charge more money for it. That kind of thing.

Sarai
Yeah, those words are just like the word natural on something. It doesn’t mean anything.

Haley
Yeah, it’s just like marketing word soup. I don’t know.

Sarai
Yeah, I think there’s a difference in people’s minds between the terms and I think depending on if you are in the sewing community and you’ve been sewing for a while, you might have a different definition of the term handmade than somebody who isn’t. I think about a lot of things that I’ve made that I am really proud of and I would kind of classify them as having a little bit of a hand done look to them. Are there some hand sewn elements to them that make them different and make them special? That’s actually what I’m really drawn to in sewing, especially right now. How can I make clothing that if I were to purchase it, it would cost a whole lot of money just because of the amount of work that has to go into it or the specialness of materials or something like that? That’s really interesting to me. Let’s get into some tips. So what are some tips for people that don’t want the look of homemade or they just want their clothing to look a little bit more polished or maybe learn some of the techniques that will kind of elevate the clothing they’re making?

You can get into some of those tips?

Haley
Yeah, totally. So my first tip is going to be spend time on pressing. This is such a huge thing that does not cost you any additional money that you can start doing with your very next sewing project. To have a better finish is really to make sure that you’re spending time on pressing that you learn proper pressing techniques. This is like number one, and I think it’s like just really great low hanging fruit. Something you can start doing today. Kind of to take that to the next level would be to invest in a couple pressing tools, like a ham, a seam roll, a sleeve board, make sure you’re using a press cloth when it’s appropriate to these kinds of things, will just one up your pressing game and give you really superior finishes. I feel like whenever people ask me for sewing tips, I’m always, like, press every sew along. I teach every tutorial. I’m like the pressing police.

Sarai
Yeah. And I think learning the techniques around it and how to do it in such a way to really open up the seam to make sure that it’s flat, make sure you’re not pressing the edges into the fabric so that you can see them on the outside. Those little things, I think, really, really help.

Haley
Totally. My next tip is going to be this is a polarizing tip, but that tip is to avoid quilting cotton when you’re trying to get that more polished look, at least, especially there’s beautiful quilting cotton out there. I’m not getting down on it. In general, I think there’s actually projects where quilting cotton can work actually really well. But especially those more novelty prints, I think are a good thing to avoid when you’re trying to get that more polished look. And then another material that I recommend avoiding when you’re trying to get a more polished look is store bought bias tape. This one I will, like, double down on because I feel pretty strongly about it. Store bought bias tape most of the time, the kind that you buy, and the little clear plastic film packages. That Joanne’s. That is a polyester and cotton blend. It’s very like papery and stiff. This is nice for beginners because it’s a lot easier to use. It’s heavily starched and stuff. But if you want to get necklines and armholes that have that really smooth, continuous curve that are less puckering, making your own bias tape, especially if you’re able to make it out of your self fabric, out of the fabric your garments sewed out of, is going to take your garments to that next level.

And just really the weight is more complimentary if you can make it out of the same fabric, too, so you don’t have this contrast of a really lightweight blouse and then this really stiff, clunky bias finish.

Sarai
Yeah. And it just looks so much more if you make it from the self fabric, it matches, and it just looks so much prettier, I think, most of the time. And I think that really affects how you feel about the garment. If the insides look as good as the outsides, then I think you tend to just have a different feeling about it.

Haley
Definitely. And I do keep pre-made bias tape around. This is kind of one of my favorite things to shop for when I’m at small fabric stores is if they have pre-made bias tape by the yard, that’s 100% cotton. I will always pick up some of that. If I find it in, like a little black and white gingham check or something that’s like, neutral, that will go with everything, because even that is going to be a better option for you than the cotton poly blend stuff.

Sarai
You can find some on Etsy, too, if you can’t find it at your local fabric store, you can even find made from Liberty Lawns, like, really pretty luxurious fabrics that can make really beautiful details on the inside or the outside of your garment. So it’s always fun to have some of those on hand, too.

Haley
Yeah, definitely. Great tip. Kind of following along the line of fabric. I think that doing your research on appropriate fabric for the project you’ve selected is a really important way to make your sewing projects just feel a little bit more special, feel really intentional, and have that more professional look. Fabric is hard. Learning about fabric is something that you will continuously do over your entire sewing journey. So some of the things that I like to do if I’m a little stuck on fabric is I look at the hashtag for the pattern, go on Instagram, look at the hashtag, see what other people are making it out of, learn from other people’s mistakes and their victories. I think that it also can be really helpful to look at what the pattern company used to make the samples out of. These pattern makers have made sometimes dozens of samples of a pattern, so they have a pretty good idea of what works really well and what doesn’t work well. So chances are they have selected the fabric for their photo samples that they think is kind of a best case scenario. So looking at those fabrics, if they’re not noted on the product page or on Instagram, most of the time, you can reach out and get that information.

Haley
And my third tip regarding fabric is to get a book, a resource about fabric. I really like Sandra Betzina’s. More Fabric Savvy. It’s a really good kind of encyclopedia about different kinds of fabrics, what kinds of things are suitable for that type of thing.

Sarai
That’s such a great book, and it tells you things like what type of needles to use with the fabric, what types of finishes to use with the fabric. It’s so helpful.

Haley
Yeah, definitely. My next recommendation is to make sure you’re using appropriate edge finishes. So are you finishing the seam allowance in a way that is appropriate for the fabric, is appropriate for the weight? If you’re making something on a sheer fabric, you should probably be using French seams to get a really neat finish. Are you adding the appropriate details like top stitching or edge stitching or under stitching, where it’s necessary. All of those things are going to give you a little bit more polished look to your garments. And then lastly, my last tip before I pass it off to Sarai, at least, is to make sure that you aren’t taking any shortcuts when it comes to your finishes. So when I’m at a thrift store, I can always tell a handmade item when someone has or a homemade item when someone has finished the raw edge of the neckline and turned it under, done a single fold hem. Sometimes that is a technique that can work for certain things, but avoiding shortcuts like that can. And using a facing or using bias tape, something like that, instead is going to give you a lot more polished look.

Sarai
Yeah, that’s a great one. So for my tips, I want to start out again with edges. So I think finishing the raw edges overall, so I’m talking about the raw edges on your seams is really important, not just to get that more polished, less homemade look, but also just for the durability and the wearability of your garment over time. So finishing the raw edges is something I think a lot of people struggle with, especially if they don’t have a serger. A serger is obviously a great way to finish your edges, but it doesn’t have to be surged. There are lots and lots of ways to finish your raw edges, and I think if you were to pick up that book that we just mentioned, Sandra Betzina’s More fabric savvy. That, again, is a great resource that can tell you some appropriate finishes depending on the type of fabric that you’re sewing with. So just to give you some examples, you could grab a pair of pinking shears and pink the seams. If a fabric that is stable enough for that, you could do a French seam like Haley just mentioned. You can turn under the edges of your seam and sew them.

There are lots and lots of ways to finish the seam, even if you don’t have a serger. But I think finishing the seam and not leaving your edges raw just goes a long way to keeping your garment looking good over time and making sure you’re not getting all those threads unraveling within your garment. It just does not feel great to put on something like that. You have to fight with the scissors every single time you put it on. So that’s one of my main tips.

I think the next one has to do with stitching. So before you start sewing, it’s a good idea to test your stitches with your fabric and just make sure you have everything set up the way you want it. So the tension on your sewing machine is right, the stitch length is correct, everything is looking good, and the stitches are pressing well before you actually start sewing. And that’s going to really help because it will give you a chance just to kind of play around with all those different elements of the stitching and make sure that you have it just the way you want it. I think if you just start sewing and you try to adjust as you go, you’re not going to be as willing to play around with things like tension or things like stitch length.
You’re just going to kind of find something that seems halfway decent and go with it. So just doing two minutes of testing can go a long way to getting the look you want.

The next tip I have is using high quality interfacing at the right weight. I think this is huge. So there’s two things here. There’s the quality of the interfacing and then there’s choosing the right interfacing. So when it comes to the quality of the interfacing, there are some interfacing out there that are plentiful at some of the big chain stores, but that are quite stiff and they may actually make your garment just a bit too stiff depending on the fabric that you’re using. So I think it’s a great idea to keep a few different types of interfacing at hand and really go for the highest quality that you can, rather than the most common thing that you can find. So that’s one thing is the quality, and then the second thing is choosing the right weight. You want to match the weight of the interfacing to your fabric. So if you have a heavier fabric, you’re going to need a heavier interfacing most of the time.

And if you have a lighter weight fabric, you’re usually going to need a lighter weight interfacing and you can experiment with different types of interfacing. Again, testing is a great use of your time. It takes just a few minutes and you can kind of see how something is going to lay when you’re done. If you just take a few different types of interfacing and apply them to scraps of fabric and see what it looks like. I personally really like knit interfacing. Even when a pattern doesn’t call for knit interfacing. I think it’s also a really good option because it has a pretty nice drape to it. It’s not as stiff as a lot of other interfacings, but again, it just depends on the fabric, depends on the project, and it’s what you’re making. So I think testing is always a really good idea.

And then the final tip that we wanted to share is actually studying ready to wear. Just see what you like. I think this is something that can really, really elevate your sewing over time. Just looking at ready to wear and seeing, what about it looks professional to you? What about it looks good to you?

Because if you can identify those things, those little details that make a garment look professional, maybe even compare them to things that you’ve made and see what the differences are, then that’s the first step to learning those techniques. So if, for example, you look at address and you see that it’s lined and it has an invisible zipper and everything looks like really enclosed on the inside and the outside, then maybe that’s something that you could apply to a future project and set a goal of learning how to do that, how to sew a zipper and a lining together, things like that. I think, and maybe even less obvious, or maybe obvious is not the right word, but less structural things, maybe even little details that you see maybe in higher end clothing. I love to look at really high end clothing and see what kinds of details they’ve added, both those structural details, but also just little decorative things, interesting trims and how they are sewn or a really special hem, or, you know, just a million different ways to play with your clothing. And I think the more you study clothing and you really look at it, the more ideas and more creativity it’s going to spark in you and the more learning that you can do, which is really, I think, one of the joys of sewing.

Also, I think, just to add to that, not just high end clothing, but I think vintage and historical clothing is another really great place to look. There’s a series of books. We have a couple at our office, I think that it’s called Vintage Details, I Want to say, and they have just close ups of garments from different time periods, and it can be really fun just to look at that for inspiration as well. There are a lot of books out there that kind of do the same thing or even buying books about particular designers that you admire. Even if you’re not into wearing that stuff yourself, can give you so many ideas, color ideas, all kinds of stuff. So I think the more you study clothing, the more you’ll learn about what polished means to you.

Haley
Definitely, I have an experience with that. Recently, I went to an Eileen Fisher sample sale, and I bought this knit jumpsuit, and I was examining how it was made, like I do with everything that I buy because I’m obsessed with sewing. And I noticed that the entire center back rise seam had clear elastic sewn into it, which it had never really occurred to me, but is such a great way to prevent the fabric from kind of, like, relaxing and drooping as you’re wearing it, so you don’t get kind of, like, soggy diaper. But over the course of the day, I was like, oh, my gosh, I’m totally doing this next time I make a knit jumpsuit or even a pair of knit pants that doesn’t have negative ease in it. So brilliant. So it doesn’t matter how practiced or expert you are sewing, you can always learn, I think, from other people’s projects and also ready to wear clothing.

Sarai
Yeah, that’s such a great example, and that’s such a good idea. I never would have thought of that.

Haley
Right?

Sarai
That’s very clever. Very cool. All right, so that brings us to the end of our tips. So I’ll just recap everything for you all real quick. But first, I wanted to mention some of the things that we talked about today that you might want to look up. So there’s the Sandra Betzina book called More Fabric Savvy. We’ll put a link to it in the show notes. Again, highly, highly recommend that you check that out. There’s also the vintage details books that I mentioned. I will look up the names of them so that we can add those to the show notes as well. I think there’s actually a few different ones. There’s one that might be called just Vintage Details, and there’s a couple that are focused on particular eras, like the 18th century, 19th century, that kind of thing. So I’ll look into that and add those in as well.

And then I also wanted to mention that if you’re looking for fabric right now for any projects that Seamwork members get discounts at some of our favorite indie fabric stores. So if that’s something you’re interested in, you might want to check that out. You can save anywhere from ten to 20% off your purchases as a Seamwork member. And a lot of people say that these discounts alone pay for their entire Seamwork membership, which is pretty cool because you get a lot of other stuff with your Steamwork membership as well. So you can see a list of participating fabricstores at Seamwork.comd/eals.

And then just to recap what we talked about today, the tips that we shared with you are to spend time on pressing that’s a big one from Haley. Avoid quilting cotton and store bought bias tape to do research on the appropriate fabric for your pattern, whether that’s with hashtags or looking at what the pattern company used. We also recommend that Sandra Betzina book, again, to get your edge finishes right, we’re talking about top stitching, edge stitching under stitching, things like that, to choose an appropriate finish with no shortcuts, especially on your edges, to finish your raw edges of the insides of your seam. And it does not have to be surge. Again, that Sandra Betzina in a book has lots of great ideas for you if you don’t have the serger to test your stitches before sewing and make sure you have them the way you want them before you start to use high quality interfacing at the right weight for your fabric.

Sarai
And then finally to study ready to wear to see what you really like and what looks professional to you.

So that’s it for us today. If you liked this episode, please leave us a review. We really appreciate it. We have one today we wanted to read from Sewing Sensation. I love that her handle on Apple podcast is Sewing Sensation. I’m sure she’s sensational. So sewing sensation says, “I really enjoy this podcast. Some sewing days are challenging, and you know those days when the seam ripper is your best friend? Their common sense approach helps me get my sewjo back, and other times helps me build my skills. Thanks, ladies.” Thank you so much. That’s really kind. What a wonderful thing to hear.

Haley
So sweet.

Sarai
Yeah, really cool. Thank you. And if you want to leave us a review, you can do that on your podcast platform of your choice, apple Podcast Spotify. Wherever you happen to listen, we’d really appreciate it. And you can also follow us on YouTube at Seamworkvideo. We have a lot of great videos there, and we’re putting a lot of work into our YouTube channel, so be sure to check that out. It’s all free. Tons of great resources there. You can follow us on Instagram at Seamwork, and if you’d like to join Seamwork and become part of our private community, plus get access to hundreds of sewing patterns and dozens of sew along classes, podcast listeners get a 50% off lifetime discount when you join Seamwork.com/go/podcast-50. And that’s it for us today. I’m Sarai.

Haley
And I’m Haley.

Sarai
And this is Seamwork Radio.

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