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Episode 84

How We Sew Through Body Changes

Sewing shines a bright spotlight on any changes your body might be going through. In this episode, Sarai and Haley share 9 tips for sewing through body changes, big and small.

Creativity can make you feel really vulnerable. Your clothes are an extension of yourself, and when you sew your own clothes, every stitch is a place for self-expression. And when you express yourself, you’re open to criticism or judgment. You might feel vulnerable.

Sewing brings your attention to your body—there’s no way around that—and it can be hard to feel creative when working so closely with your body. You’re hyper-aware of what you look like in the mirror, you spend a lot of time analyzing how clothes fit and feel on your body, and above all, you have to write down all of your measurements, often several times a year. So sewing shines a bright spotlight on any changes your body might be going through. Changes of all kinds are complex, but changes in your body are remarkably intimate.

In this episode, Sarai and Haley share 9 tips for sewing through body changes, big and small.


Podcast Transcript

Sarai
Hi. Welcome back to Seamwork Radio. So today we’re talking about how we sew through body changes. And we’re we’re going to talk about the times that we were personally challenged by body changes and then the nine tips that we found for sewing through body changes, both large and small.

So let’s start with our icebreaker today. Haley, is there an outfit your parents made you wear as a kid that you hated?

Haley
Yeah, definitely. I had a lot of opinions about my clothing from a young age. But the one thing that stands out to me the most is that my mom was always trying to get me to wear turtlenecks and put turtlenecks under everything, like underneath your Halloween costume, you got to wear a turtleneck. And just like all the time. And I always felt like she was just like, killing my vibe. I hated it. I hated turtlenecks. And it took me—I like them now—but I feel like it took me a really long time to circle back to liking them because I just have such a strong negative kneejerk reaction to them.

Sarai
That’s so funny because you grew up in the desert.

Haley
Yeah, I grew up in the middle of the desert in California. And I run hot. I’m always hot. And my mom’s trying to get me to wear some turtleneck under my Raggedy Ann costume. And she’s like, but the sun is going to go down and it’s going to be cold. I’m like, it’s going to be 75, chill.

Sarai
Just trying to protect little Haley.

Haley
I know. And she grew up on the East Coast, so she knows what real cold is. She probably just thought, oh, my soft desert child is going to freeze in the 70 degree weather.

Sarai
I don’t remember like an everyday outfit that I hated. But I have this memory of, we did this photo session when I was a kid. It was like, I would guess 1980, 1990 somewhere around there. Judging by my age and the resulting photos, my grandmother, I think she still has this up in her house at huge portrait size that was done with me, my brother and my sister and my cousins, my mom’s, sisters, kids. There are quite a few of us. There were probably eight of us or something. And we all had to wear these matching velvet gowns with white starched collars. Almost all of us have bowl cuts. Also. We all have bowl cuts and we’re all wearing these little Dutch boy outfits. And I have memories of that day and how miserable it was. Also hot and we all had to be still, which, you know, children are not too keen on being still for long periods of time. And it was really itchy. Everybody was complaining and my brother was crying. You can see in the picture that his eyes are red. He was crying, and the photographer was trying to distract us with bubbles, and it was just a hot mess.

But I remember that outfit mostly because every time I go over to my grandmother’s house, it’s like they are larger than life. On her wall. Strange photo of all these children wearing these velvet gowns with white collars. White like, lacy starched collars and bowl cuts.

Haley
The bowl cuts. My favorite detail, probably. And it wasn’t just that you had a bowl cut. It was that there were many bowl cuts.

Sarai
Yes, we all had bowl cuts. So funny. I’ll see if I can dig up that picture. It’s hilarious. I had a bowl cut for quite a long time, and I always wanted long hair when I was a little girl. I was kind of a girly girl when I was little, and I wanted to wear, like, pretty dresses and have long hair, and my mom was having none of it.

Haley
I was never allowed to have long hair when I was little either. And then I was like, When I grow up, I’m going to have long hair. And then I grew up and I was like, no, that’s too much work, man.

Sarai
Yeah. So if you have an ice breaker that you want to share with us so we can use it on a future episode, you can do that by going to seamwork..com/go/icebreakers, if you remember. And there’s a thread on the community where you can post them and we might use one on a future episode.

But today what we wanted to talk about, as I said earlier, is sewing for a changing body. And that’s something that can be really challenging for all of us. I think we all go through body changes. We all have to deal with this at some point in our lives, sometimes many points in our lives. And I think it can be really demotivating, especially if you anticipate future body changes and you realize that your body is going to change soon for whatever reason, whatever life stage you’re in or major change that you know is coming, they can really zap your creativity and make you feel like it’s really just not worth it. Why? Why make things for a body that you know is going to change?

So I think just making things that you’re not going to be able to wear, it feels bad. It doesn’t feel great to make stuff that, you know, you might not be able to wear. So I just talk about some practices that you can use or some ways that you can approach your sewing when you’re going through these times in your life that I think we all go through and figure out ways that you can still have fun sewing and still make the most of it and get everything that you love about selling out of it. While dealing with these changes.

The other thing that I wanted to mention is that I think the other reason that this can be difficult when it comes to sewing is that sewing is a very body-centric activity. It puts a lot of attention on your body and what your body looks like and what it measures at and what it feels like. And so that can be really hard if you’re having trouble processing whatever changes you’re going through. And changes of any kind can be difficult to deal with. I think changes related to your body can be especially difficult to deal with.

So that’s completely natural. And then sewing just kind of shines the spotlight on that difficulty. So I just wanted to highlight that because I think it’s worth acknowledging that it’s normal to feel that way when you’re going through these things, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that you have to give up sewing during that time. So, Haley, do you want to talk about some times in your life that you experienced this? Is there’s a time where body changes kept you from sewing?

Haley
Yeah, totally. All of my adult life is just naturally somewhere around a size 14. Sometimes I’m a little smaller, sometimes I’m a little bigger. But the one time that body changes affected my sewing the most was definitely when I was pregnant. I probably sewed, I don’t know, maybe like five or six things. My entire pregnancy, which for me over like a ten-month period, is not very much sewing. And all of the things that I made were, not all of them, but a handful of the things felt really uninspired. So it felt like a chore and something that I didn’t really want to do during that time because I was so frustrated by the idea of making something that didn’t have a lot of longevity and just seemed kind of like boring to me.

Sarai
Yeah.

Haley
And I think probably about halfway through my pregnancy, which happened to be in the summer, I got a little bit more creative with it and started making things that worked for me during my pregnancy. And those are things that I still wear today that are in regular rotation in my wardrobe.

Sarai
So you did find a way kind of around that feeling?

Haley
Yeah, I figured it out eventually, but I just kind of adopted, like, a little bit of a defeatist attitude early on. I was like, why bother? There’s no point. And then I missed it. So I came up with some work around, which I think we’ll talk a little bit about later, but it’s definitely draining. And also just like, I don’t know, it can be challenging sometimes to see your body change.

And I try to practice body neutrality. And for my own mental health, I find it easiest to not focus on my body during those times. And when you’re sewing for yourself, you have to look at your body under a microscope to really, like, figure out how to get things to fit and how to make things work as best as possible. So sometimes, honestly, sewing can be not so great for my mental health during those times. But I figured out some workarounds to make it fun still.

Sarai
Yeah, that’s good. I think this sounds like a normal cycle, kind of in the beginning feeling maybe this isn’t worth it. I don’t want to do this and then figuring it out as you kind of progress along until you get to a place where you’re able to enjoy both.

Haley
Yeah, totally. What about you, Sarai?

Sarai
Yeah, I definitely have had some times where my weight has fluctuated a lot. My body has changed a lot. I went through a period when I was, like late teens, early 20s. My weight fluctuated a lot, like quite a lot. I gained and lost a lot of weight due to a number of factors. And there were some mental health struggles that went along with that that were both cause and effect, That I think really impeded my ability or desire to be creative at all. And it’s a little hard to pull apart those things, which really caused that, because when you’re depressed, then you generally don’t want to do much of anything with that. But then eventually this is kind of earlier on in my sewing journey, you might say. And I eventually began to sew more and more. And I think that really helped me to develop a more positive relationship with my body and more body acceptance than I’ve ever had before. Because if you can approach sewing in the right way, it really teaches you how to look at your body in a more realistic and objective way rather than a judgmental way.

That’s not something that is necessarily true, but I think if you take the right mindset to it, then it can be. So I think, like you, Haley, I kind of went through a period where I didn’t want to do anything related to sewing or anything else, and then over time found sewing to actually be a practice that helped me to get more in-tune with my body and more accepting of it. So it’s kind of interesting. It’s an interesting issue because the body and the mind are so interconnected, and it’s really hard to pull apart the things that make you have that kind of motivation to do a craft, like sewing. And if it’s something that’s going on mentally, if it’s something that’s going on physically, it’s all related.

Haley
And I think something that’s hard too, is not just that I’m going to have to be very intimate with my body and really take a hard look at that data so that I can sell clothing for myself. But it also can feel kind of like wasteful if you’re going to be making things that you feel like, oh, I’m not going to be able to wear this in six months from now and then going to have to get rid of it eventually. How do you feel about getting rid of your me made garments? Do you get rid of things that no longer fit, or do you hold on to them?

Sarai
I’m going to guess that you’re probably in the same boat as me. I’m pretty good about getting rid of things that don’t fit me. I don’t tend to hold onto them. I don’t think it’s really worth it. And for me personally, just again, from a mental health perspective, I don’t like the idea of holding on to something if it’s something that I think, oh, well, maybe my body will change and I’ll fit into that again, and that can create all kinds of weird thought patterns and kind of interrupt the body acceptance and body neutrality that we’re talking about. Then you’re starting to have this desire to fit into this thing again. So that’s one reason. And then I just don’t like having a lot of stuff I’m not using around. So I’m pretty good about getting rid of things. What about you?

Haley
Yeah, I’m pretty brutal with getting rid of stuff. If I can’t fit it into it, if it doesn’t serve me, then there’s someone else who can find more joy. I’ll sell it, I’ll give it away. I don’t need it in my life. On a rare occasion sometimes if I feel like if it’s in my natural ten-pound set point, like, oh, this might go away into a box I have under my bed where I keep the more of like, my someday maybe clothes. But I’m not in the business of keeping things that are one or two sizes too big or too small.

Sarai
Yeah, that’s a good point because my body does fluctuate, too, within 10 pounds or so. And yeah, I’m talking about the stuff that’s, like pretty far from where I am in either direction.

Haley
Yeah, totally. That’s the only time I’ve had regrets where I’m like, I got rid of this one vintage shirt comes to mind. It was a button up sleeveless shirt, gingham. And it was like a linen fabric, really cute. And I tried it on one day, and it was maybe like an inch too small for my bus. Like, it fit, but it was just like a little gappy. And then in a fit of anger, I was like, this is going in the Goodwill pile. Screw this. And I think about that shirt all the time. I’m like, man, that was so cute. It honestly would probably fit me right now. Huge regrets.

Sarai
So what are some tips that have helped you to sew through body changes, Haley?

Haley
Well, I guess in terms of things that I learned, especially during my pregnancy, is that my number one thing that really helped me was identifying the parts of my body that weren’t fluctuating as much and then sewing things that fit that area. So a really good example would be I made a dress using the Clark pattern, which is one of our Seamwork patterns. And it’s a top, but I hacked it into a dress and the Clark design is a tank top, but it’s fitted through the shoulders and upper bust and a little bit through the bust and then kind of like flares out from there. And I made a really cute self-tie that wrapped around the waist twice and it’s kind of a midi length and has this high slit. So cute, but it’s very like fitted in the upper bust so it’s not like a total sack. And then I had the belt so that it was adaptable. I wore it like an empire waist back then. And it’s probably one of my most worn summertime garments now. I wear it all the time without the belt for like a cute breezy look.

And with the belt and that was like a huge that was probably like my A-HA moment when I was sewing during my pregnancy. I’m like, this is where it’s at. So things that fit up here and then let everything else just be easy, breezy and free.

Sarai
Yeah, that’s a good one. I think that’s a good tip. It’s identifying the parts of your body that you can fit and that aren’t fluctuating as much. And so in things that fit in those areas.

Haley
Rather than worrying about the parts of your body that maybe are changing and this is going to be different kind of for everybody depending on your body type or what changes you are going through are anticipating going through. But oftentimes I find that the upper chest and the shoulder are pretty safe bets when you’re taking that approach.

Sarai
Yeah, definitely. I think another thing that has helped me. So this is kind of our second tip is sewing more with knits and also using more elastic, more just generally stretch fabrics or using drawstrings and adjustable closures, things that you can easily move around and change in that way. I think that’s really helpful. I think a good example of this is in my closet is the Lucy jumpsuit, which is one of our patterns. I have that. It’s a knit. It has a drawstring and elastic waist. And even if my body is fluctuating up or down 10 pounds or so, it totally fits me just fine. And it’s super comfortable. So I think just leaning into those types of projects, depending on what your body changes are, can be really, really helpful and help you make things that are comfy no matter what size you’re at at that moment, and also still really fun to sew.

Haley
Yes. Lucy is a great example because it’s knit and it has that adjustable drawstring waist. So it’s kind of like doing double duty there.

Sarai
Yeah. And then another thing you could do is so some outerwear, because that’s something like we were saying, Haley, where your shoulders and upper bust maybe are not changing quite as much as the rest of your body usually. So when you’re going through these kinds of body changes, you can still usually sew outerwear. Not always. There might be depending on what the changes are, but oftentimes you can still sew outerwear and make that work for you, no matter what kind of fluctuations you’re having. I know that I’ve had outerwear in my closet, in my coat closet downstairs, there’s outerwear that I’ve had for 10, 15, 20 years because, well, not only does it last a really long time, often if you’re putting it over other clothing and you’re probably not washing it as much, but also it’s going to fit almost no matter what, unless it’s something super fitted, it’s probably going to fit.

Haley
Yeah. I think that outerwear is generally designed with extra ease because it’s anticipated that you’re going to be wearing it over other layers of things. And so that additional ease makes it so much more forgiving when you’re dealing with body fluctuations. And I think that I love sewing outerwear. I know you do, too. I think it’s just so fun and gratifying. And it’s like this beautiful little love letter you can sew for yourself and wear all the time. You get so much use out of outerwear. And if you’re just having, like, not super yummy body feels, then I definitely recommend sewing yourself like a rad coat out of the most luxurious fabric that you have in your stash and just owning it.

Sarai
Yeah, for sure. I always think about there’s this book by the American designer Claire McCardell, and she I don’t remember the name of the book, but we’ll put it in the show notes. She wrote this book, I’m guessing probably in the 60s, maybe the 50s, about fashion, how to dress, that sort of thing. And she has these kind of, like, rules, her kind of style rules. And one of them is she recommends that women have lots of different coats and different colors, like, have a bunch of bold coats because it’s something that you’ll have for a long time. And instead of having just one boring beige or black coat that you wear all the time, you can really mix up your wardrobe and extend your wardrobe by having a bunch of different coats. And that’s definitely something that I have in my wardrobe. I have a lot of coats. I love coats.

Haley
I love that I generally do not subscribe to fashion rules and wear this, don’t wear this. Everyone needs to have this in their closet. But that is one I can get behind.

Sarai
Yes. I think it’s fine if you don’t look at them as rules. That as well. These are her personal rules. What can I take from it, especially if they’re contrarian like that? Because I think at that time it’s probably not the norm to invest in multiple coats when you could have one good coat so it’s a really cute book, too. It’s got really cute illustrations in it.

The other thing that we could suggest is to explore more niche sewing. We’ve talked about niche sewing before on the podcast. And if you’re sewing things like bags or you’re sewing things like you’re trying to make shoes, or maybe learning to work with leather, or just trying some different kinds of skills that aren’t necessarily things that need to fit your changing body, that can be a really fun way to still incorporate sewing into your life and also learn some new things while you’re going through this particular phase of your life. And I think that’s really fun. I think sewing bags is really fun. It’s something I wish I did more because it’s so practical. I’ve been thinking about sewing some not bags, but like baskets and things for my house and home deck, kind of stuff like that, which I think could be really fun.

So I think that’s something maybe we overlook as garments sewers sometimes that there’s all these different ways to apply our skills. And you’ll probably learn something that you can apply to your garment sewing later, too. And then also it can also be a good time to explore some different styles and really think about what you like to wear in this moment in your life, rather than what used to feel good to you. So I think it’s kind of embracing change and recognizing that what you felt good in at one time won’t necessarily be you forever. And that’s okay. We all change and our bodies change, and sometimes our style changes along with that, and our body can sometimes lead that change. Sometimes it comes more from within, but sometimes it comes more from our actual body shape and what feels good to us at that moment in time. So maybe think about things that what you consider, maybe, quote, unquote, flattering on you in the past isn’t necessarily what you feel great in now, and that’s okay. And that’s just a normal part of life. So I think it can be a good opportunity to explore some styles you hadn’t considered before.

Haley
Yeah, totally. I think that I really do not like the whole idea of flattering and unflattering. I think that it’s so limiting in the things that we dress our bodies in. And I try to focus more on what feels good and what doesn’t feel good. And I find that to be, like, so much more of a productive, less body centric way to think about things. Just like a little mind trick that I play on myself. That kind of helps. Speaking of me not believing in flattering and unflattering, I think that you should just go and sew some sacks. I think that a beautiful sack is highly underrated. And I’m going to tell you why. I have reasons. I think that big, voluminous garments are such a great place to focus on fabric, and you get to play with prints and colors and fibers, and the focus is really on the garment and not on the body. And I think that can be very liberating. Plus, they’re just a lot of fun to sew because you’re not fussing with a lot of fitting. You’re just focusing on the practice of sewing. And I think that in itself is very ringing as an activity.

Sarai
Yes, I’ve been thinking about making, like, a big sack dress for the summer, but incorporating some really fun details into it. Like, I don’t know, some little pleat details or, like, lace insertion or just some really fine details into what is otherwise like a very shapeless plain dress. And I really like that look. It’s like modern, but also a little bit romantic. And I think it can be really nice.

Haley
Can be so fun. When I was pregnant, I gave myself the task of once I kind of started to figure out sewing for myself, I decided that I was going to make two Bo tops. And Bo is one of our. It’s a really popular pattern of ours, and it’s just like a very boxy woven tea with cute little cuffs. And I decided that I was going to take two of the fancier fabrics out of my stash and sew something for myself with them. And I made Bos, and one of them is a silk and cotton twill that’s, like, really, really gauzy and super shifty and kind of annoying to sew with, but just, like, so gorgeous. And it’s a little sheer, which I love a sheer moment. And then the other one was this really great rayon crepe, which I absolutely love as well. And I think that I wear those two Bo tops all the time still, and they were great. I would layer them over dresses when I had, like, a big belly, and it was awesome. So I recommend making yourself not just any sack, a super fancy sack.

Sarai
Yeah, that’s great. A really fancy sack. And then if you do want a little bit more shape, you can always make a little, like, tie belt or something for it. And if you want to define your waist or define an empire waist, if you’re pregnant or kind of don’t feel comfortable showing your waist as much, then you can use a tie belt to still give you a little bit of shape. And that’s something that’s really, really flexible. Or you could leave it off some days, use it some days.

Haley
Like, that something that I find that can be kind of helpful. I’m fairly short and also curvy. And so a trick that I like to use when I’m making a sack and I’m not, like, so concerned about, like, creating an hourglass look is that I don’t want the fabric to look like it’s swallowing me whole is that I lean towards draperier fabrics, because then you can see, like, a hint of the body underneath that’s more of a trick so that it doesn’t look like my clothes are wearing me. I like to wear my clothes so that can be another little trick to lean into those little drapier or even a little sheer fabric just to show, like, a little something you don’t want to hide beneath your clothes necessarily. I don’t know. You do you whatever feels good to your body.

Our next tip is to find pieces in your closet that you feel really good in. I think that this is, like, a really good practice that I do from time to time. I go into my closet and I just start trying things on, and I’ll take pictures of myself little selfies in the mirror and kind of look back on.

Like, how does that make me feel? How do I feel about the look of it? Does it align with who I feel like in this moment in time? And I think that that’s, like, a really good practice. And then you can identify the things you like and try and emulate that in your me made garments.

Sarai
Yeah. I think it was a good thing to do, no matter what. It’s really helpful just to I think it helps to surface things in your closet that maybe that you hadn’t worn in a while and you’ve forgotten about, too. One of the things I’ve been trying to do is if I wear an outfit one day that I really like. I’m working from home these days. I also have a lot of outdoor work that I do, and I don’t want to put as much effort into my outfits as I maybe did when I was going to an office every day. So one thing I’ve been doing is if I do put on outfit that really works, like, really functional, feels comfortable. I feel good in it. I look at it, I’ll take a picture and just keep it in a folder on my phone so that I can remember that one in the future.

Haley
And I don’t have to make sure I do the same thing, Sarai. I do the exact same thing. I totally look at what I’m having those days where I’m like, nothing feels good. I don’t know what to wear. I don’t have anything. I look at my little folder, and I have, like, a bunch of cute little outfits in there.

Sarai
It’s a good way to use things that maybe, like, if there’s something that I don’t wear that often, and then I wear it one day and like, oh, this is really cute and comfortable. And if I wear it with this thing, I really like the way it looks, and it’s a way for me to remind myself that it exists. Doesn’t get buried in my closet totally.

Haley
It’s a good practice for identifying things that make you feel good in your body, but also things that are just vibing with your style. In that moment in time. It’s ten out of ten recommend that kind of leads me to my next tip, which is normalize looking at your body.

Don’t avoid looking at yourself. I think a lot of us can identify with this. I know I can. There’s times in my life where I didn’t want to be in pictures for whatever reason. I didn’t take pictures of myself. I didn’t like look at myself in the mirror as much. And I think that there’s kind of a fine line of like, having a more passive existence with your body, which I think can be healthy and fine from time to time. But then also there’s this. It can go into kind of like dissociating from your body, and that can be kind of bad. So I think normalizing looking at your body and that practice of taking pictures of yourself in the mirror and you can save them in a folder on your phone, I know on iPhone, you can create a private folder and you can save it there.

So it’s not a bunch of pictures in your camera roll of yourself, if that makes you feel weird for whatever reason. But it’s so helpful and kind of to echo that normalizing looking at other people who have bodies that are similar to your own. I love following people who have similar body types to me or similar measurements to me because I get so many ideas when I see them wearing something cute, I’m like, oh my God, they look so cute in that. I bet I would look super cute in that, too. And it feels sometimes easier to be complimentary or kind to another person’s body than it is to be those things to your own. And I think that the more you’re surrounding yourself with kind of the data, the evidence that you are hot and you are a Babe and there are so many things that you can wear that you’re going to look and feel really good in, the better you’re going to feel. And while you’re at it, maybe unfollow some people that maybe don’t give you such good feelings.

Sarai
Yeah. I think one of the things that really helped me on my path to being more accepting and loving towards my body when I was younger is recognizing that there are all these different types of beauty. There isn’t just one type of beauty that we need to aspire to and looking at images of people that don’t fit in with these normalized standards of what either the fashion industry or magazines or whatever we’re promoting at that time, but who still, to me, exuded something really special and recognizing that that could be done in so many different ways. And so many different people are beautiful in their own special, unique way and recognizing that and different types of people, I think was really, really helpful to me in coming to terms with any kind of body shame that I was dealing with. And I think no matter what you’re going through in terms of your feelings of your body or changes in your body, just that appreciation of diversity can be really impactful on you. Personally, I’m all for that tip. So I’m going to recap what we talked about today before we go. So the tips that we shared today, we had a lot of them.

The first one was to identify some parts of your body that maybe aren’t fluctuating as much when you’re going through body changes and sewing things that fit well in those areas, rather than just sewing shapeless things unless you want to.

Sewing with knits in things like elastic, stretch fabrics, drawstrings and things like that, things that can be adaptable is another tip.

Sewing some outerwear can be really a great time to do that if you’re going through a lot of body changes, exploring niche sewing, including things like bags or shoes or home decorating projects or all different kinds of sewing that you can do that doesn’t rely on having a perfect fit. It could be a great way to learn skills at the same time, exploring some different styles. If your body’s going through changes, maybe what you once felt good in isn’t really you right now, and that that’s okay. And that our style evolves as we change.

And then the next one is to sew some sacks and just focus on the fabric and using something really special or incorporating some really cool details, things that you love. And doing that in a shape that’s not as fitted can be a great way to still really enjoy your sewing, find pieces in your closet that you feel really good in, and then try to emulate those.

And then the last couple of tips are not to avoid looking at yourself and really expose yourself to your own body by looking at yourself and not shying away from looking at yourself or taking pictures, that sort of thing.

And then also the same for others. Make sure that you feel like you’re getting enough diversity in the images that you consume. And looking at people that look like you can really, really help you to come to terms with where you’re at at this moment in time and recognize that beauty comes in all forms.

So those are our tips for you today. And if you want to hear more about this subject, I highly recommend an episode that we did last year with Maggie called Sewing for a Changing Body. And it’s her story about sewing during times when her body went through some really, really dramatic changes. And what that’s like for her? I really recommend that episode. It was really awesome.

And then also Haley mentioned the Bo top, which is real boxy top that we have really easy to sew, really fun to sew, and you can make a whole bunch of them in all different fabrics. It doesn’t take a ton of fabric, so if you want to sew a sack type outfit with us. We actually have a free class on the Bo top. So if you go to Seamwork.com/go/learntosew. That will sign you up and we’ll send you a link to the Bo class, which you can take with us if you want. And if you want to sign up for Seamwork membership as a podcast listener, you get half off our unlimited membership.

So if you’re interested in that and you want to participate in the community and also get access to over 200 sewing patterns along with our classes, you can join us and get that 50% off. And if you like this episode, we would love if you would leave us a review on your podcast platform of choice. Whether it’s Apple Podcast or whatever podcast platform you use really helps us out. It helps people to discover the podcast and we love reading them. It’s so wonderful to read what you guys write. So we have a review here we wanted to share from Stephanie.

I just love this review, so we had to share it today. Stephanie writes, I love listening to the Seamwork podcast while I’m sewing. I’ve been really into the series about sewing by design and how it really breaks down the skills, steps, and most of all, mindset that goes into successful sewing. Personally, I classify myself as more of an advanced sewer, but I teach beginning sewing lessons and will certainly use some of your ideas and concepts with my students as there is so much to overcome. Learn and keep in mind when you’re a beginner. So thank you. And I’ll be listening and thinking of your intelligent, fun and warm guidance as I’m teaching this wonderful and valuable skill that we love and share. That’s so wonderful, Stephanie. Thank you so much for leaving that review. Really thoughtful.

Haley
Yeah. Talk about warm and kind and fun, giving me all of the good feelings right now with those words. Thank you.

Sarai
Yes. Thank you so much, Stephanie. What an awesome audience you guys are. Thank you so much for all your kind words. We really appreciate them. We couldn’t do this without you guys. So thank you so much. So with that, we’re going to end our episode today. I’m Sarai.

Haley
I’m Haley, and this is Seamwork Radio.

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