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Episode 125

How I Designed a 5-piece Wardrobe

Want to sew a capsule wardrobe? If you need help narrowing down your choices, Sarai and Haley will show you how to turn all the inspiration you’ve gathered for your wardrobe into a final plan that really fits your life right now.

Podcast Transcript

Sarai
I’m Sarai.

Haley
And I’m Haley.

Sarai
And this is Seamwork Radio. Welcome back to Seamwork Radio, where we share practical ideas for building a creative process so you can sew with intention and joy.

And today we’re talking about how I designed a five-piece capsule wardrobe, and we’re going to cover the process I went through and how I took my ideas from inspiration to a final plan that really fits my life and fits my needs right now. So if you have trouble really narrowing down your choices or making practical garments that you actually wear, stay tuned to hear all five tips, because I learned a lot from this process.

All right, so we’re going to start with our ice breaker for today, which is from Vanessa, and Vanessa asks, “What’s your favorite crossover sewing tool? Something that wasn’t designed for sewing but that you find useful.” I love this question. What’s yours, Haley?

Haley
My favorite — I didn’t come up with this. This is actually a tip from the late and great David Page Coffin, but he recommended using surgical forceps, the kind that kind of lock into place to turn corners on things like collars. And it is one of my favorite little nifty tricks, and I’m not big on highly specific sewing tools, but this is one I definitely keep on hand. It’s really great for things, especially waistbands on really heavy fabrics, where it’s just so much easier to have something that has a vise grip to turn those corners out really nicely. So that’s one that I love to use. What about you?

Sarai
That’s a great one. And David Page Coffin had so many awesome tips for things like that. Not just tools, but just different ways of doing things that were so helpful. He’s definitely one of the O.G.s for me. My favorite tool that I use all the time in sewing that is not specifically designed for sewing is a screw hole punch. And if you’re not familiar with the screw hole punch, it’s basically, so when you’re cutting out patterns and you need to make markings, you need to transfer your markings, there’s often going to be, like, little circles that you need to mark on your fabric. Right. So it can be kind of challenging to do that. So I always, in the past, would have to kind of, like, punch through with the tip of a pen or a pencil, and it’s just kind of like it’s hard to do, and it makes sort of a mess, and sometimes you tear your pattern. And so the screw hole punch is basically a hole punch that you can punch anywhere in a piece of fabric, so it doesn’t have to be right on the edge. Like with a regular hole punch, you can do it anywhere.

How would you describe the way it looks, Haley? Looks like an awl kind of, I guess, with a wood handle.

Haley
It has kind of a screw mechanism type thing.

Sarai
Yeah. And there are different tips for it. So you can do different sizes, but if you need to punch a hole somewhere right in the middle of your pattern, you can do that really easily. If you’re doing it on a self healing cutting mat, it’s not a problem at all. So I love that. I use it every single time I cut patterns out, and I just think it’s the most handy little tool.

Haley
I love them. When I was in school and I learned pattern drafting, you use an awl to punch holes and things, but it’s like the virgo in me hates how messy it looks, and the screw punch makes such a tidy, perfect little hole, and I love it. I’m obsessed.

Sarai
All right, so that was a great icebreaker. Thank you, Vanessa, for that question. And if you have an icebreaker for a future episode, just let us know. If you’re a member, you can go to Seamwork.com/go/icebreakers, and that will take you to a post on our community where you can share your question that we’ll use on a future episode. So thanks again, Vanessa.

All right, so today we’re talking about making a capsule wardrobe, and specifically my experience with designing a capsule wardrobe and some of the things that I’ve learned from doing that. So for me, it’s really easy to get caught up in making fun stuff that I just wear once in a while and not all the time. So I really often neglect to make the things that I know I’d wear all the time because they seem not as interesting or not as exciting as something that is going to have a lot of maybe fanciness to it or a lot of, I don’t know, maybe it’s got, like, some trendiness to it, or it’s just something that’s catching my eye in the moment versus those classic pieces that go with everything. So that’s one issue.

I think another issue for me is that it’s also hard to make things that are going to go together rather than just one-offs, unless I do some planning. There’s a third issue actually, for me specifically, and this might not be an issue for other people, but because I live pretty far from any fabric stores, I need to really kind of plan ahead what I’m going to make because I can’t just run out and grab some thread or grab the exact fabric I need. So I prefer to plan things out so that I can buy things in batches. So that’s another reason for me. And that might apply to you if you order fabric mostly online or you live in a fabric desert, or you just can’t get to the fabric store or other places, like maybe a copy shop to print your patterns as often as you’d like.

So those are some of the reasons I wanted to investigate the idea of making a capsule wardrobe. And I was really inspired by this blogger that I follow to try out a capsule wardrobe because she did it over the fall and she basically was wearing almost the same things every day but kind of mixing and matching them.

And I mean, I thought she looked amazing. So that’s kind of something I want to try. I think it’s a good sort of experiment to do with yourself too, just to kind of realize how little you really need versus how much you want. Because for me, I feel like I’m always interested in new things and buying new things or making new things, and you don’t always need them in order to feel like yourself, in order to feel like you’re dressing in the way that you really want to dress. And that represents who you are. So those are some of the reasons behind it and maybe those appeal to you too. So that’s kind of what I did. But how about you, Haley? Have you ever tried to sew a capsule wardrobe before?

Haley
I have done it once before and it was right before I had Charley. I made a loungewear capsule wardrobe. I knew that I was going to be like, obviously in the postpartum period, you’re at home all the time with a baby, you need to be comfortable. She was born in December, so it was the middle of the winter. And so I just wanted to like, do something nice for myself to prioritize feeling good and my personal comfort before that kind of chaotic moment in my life. So I made a little capsule wardrobe. I also bought a few things, if I’m being like 100% honest. And I cleared out one of the drawers in my dresser and I put all of the pieces of my capsule wardrobe in there so that when I got dressed in the morning or at night or whatever. Because what is time when you have a newborn? But it made it so easy to just reach in and everything went together, everything. I felt really good and cozy and comforted by wearing and it was like one of the most—the best acts of self care that I did for myself leading up to that moment.

Sarai
That’s really cool. I think that’s really interesting that you found it so helpful during that particular period of your life too, that you were kind of something you’re anticipating and that you’re able to use that as a way to kind of prepare and feel in the right head space, I guess, when it actually came.

Haley
Yeah, I mean, thinking about what you’re going to wear day to day takes up a lot of headspace and so I think it takes a lot of discipline to do it on a day-to-day basis or every single season. But when you’re heading into any kind of chapter of your life where you think is going to be a little taxing in one way or another, I think that it’s like a really cool idea.

Sarai
That’s interesting because I often hear people say one of the benefits of a capsule wardrobe is not having to think about what you’re going to put on in the morning. And I could see that. For me, that isn’t really a big motivation because I actually like putting together outfits in the morning, and I don’t feel like it’s a burden for me. But I think if you’re going through a particular period where maybe it’s a high stress period, or you just have a lot going on, I could see that being an additional reason in addition to the ones that I already mentioned for myself, something that you might want to explore. So that’s really interesting.

Haley
So what about you?

Sarai
I’ve done Design Your Wardrobe pretty much every season since we started doing the program years and years ago. So I always spend time, at least some time every season, designing, to a certain extent, designing what I’m going to make and pre-planning what I’m going to make to a certain extent. I wouldn’t usually call it a capsule wardrobe, though, because to me, a capsule wardrobe is something that you can put together that’s sort of apart from your regular wardrobe that you choose from those particular pieces and those particular looks. So if anybody out there is familiar with the 10 X 10 challenge, which is something that goes on on blogs and social media, I think once a year I’m not sure if it’s I think maybe it’s more than once a year we’ll put a link to it in the show notes. But people choose ten pieces from their wardrobe and only wear those ten pieces for a certain amount of time. To me, that’s more of what I’m talking about when I talk about a capsule wardrobe versus just designing your sewing in such a way that it’s going to mesh with your existing wardrobe, which I think is also an incredible exercise and something we definitely recommend, and it’s something that Design Your Wardrobe is built around.

So I think you can use that process for both of these things. But that’s kind of my definition of a capsule wardrobe, and this is the first time I’ve ever attempted that, actually having a separate capsule wardrobe.

Haley
You mentioned that you like the process of getting dressed in the morning, and that kind of like creativity. Do you find that you enjoy having a lot of choices to choose from when you’re getting dressed or fewer options?

Sarai
That’s a really good question, because I was thinking about this recently, and part of me really likes having a lot of choice, but I also feel like it does dilute kind of my style, and I often lose track of what I already have because I think I have kind of a lot of clothes. I think my wardrobe is pretty big because I sew and because I like to thrift and bring, you know, old pieces, new life. So I feel like I have a pretty extensive wardrobe, and most of it does feel like me, but I feel like it’s harder to get a defined look that really represents who you are when you have a lot to choose from. What do you think? Do you feel that way?

Haley
Yeah, I definitely err on the side of a little bit smaller wardrobe. I mean, I have three drawers of clothes and kind of under bed storage box of sweaters and cardigans, and all of my hanging stuff fits in about the space of, like, a coat closet, really. I mean, for someone who’s like, you know, my job is clothing, I feel like that’s more modest than a lot of my friends. I find a lot of creativity in constraints. So I don’t know if I would ever go hella minimalist and have a ten-piece wardrobe or something like that, but I find, like, a less is more for me. Definitely. I find more creativity in that.

Do you find that you put off making those more, like, boring? I’m using air quotes, “boring” sewing projects that a lot of the times not for everybody, but for a lot of the times are kind of the ingredients to a good capsule wardrobe. Do you find that you put those off even if you’d wear them, like, all the time?

Sarai
I definitely do. I think there are a few reasons for that. I think one is that they tend to be basics in some way. When I talk in a little while about what I decided to make for this capsule wardrobe, I think you’ll see what I mean with some of them. They’re sort of basics. So that is, I think, inherently a little bit less exciting. I enjoy wearing a lot of neutral colors. I wear a lot of black and I wear a lot of white and cream, and I feel like those are, less so for the white and cream, because I feel like you can see more detail with that. I think with black, it can feel a little bit flat and boring. It’s harder to see the details. Black just I love wearing black, but making things in just black fabric just feels like it just kind of want to jazz it up.

I think those are some of the reasons why I do put off making those more boring projects. I think what helps with that is finding ways to make it interesting or exciting or luxurious for yourself. Choosing a really amazing fabric like a silk or something like that, instead of something that’s a little bit more basic, adding little details to it. Because I think even basic projects can have really interesting details. If you just do a little research and a little bit of planning to find what you could add that’s going to still keep it basic enough to wear it a lot, but make it, give it just a little bit of interest for yourself.

Haley
Yeah, I definitely struggle with making the leg the less exciting pieces. There’s been a pair of Dexter pants on my sewing queue for a minute for like the past couple of months, and I’ve started like two—it’s at the top of my queue for a while—but I’ve started two projects since adding it to my sewing queue. And I was just thinking, I just really want to make them. I have a black ponte that would be perfect for them. And I was trying to think of something to sweeten the pot for myself and I was like, well, what if I made a pair of like I have some black stretch velvet I want to make some lounge pants out of. What if I like, sweeten the pot and cut them and then sew them at the same time because they’re both black. I can have my serger and my machine threaded up. I can cut them at the same time. And maybe that would trick myself. The construction will be mostly the same. Trick myself into sewing these. I don’t know.

Sarai
That’s a great idea. I love that I’ve been thinking about that because in designing this and thinking about things that I would make in those very basic colors like black or white, I was thinking, how can I batch my sewing more when I’ve got my serger threaded with black thread already? Just take advantage of it. That’s a really good idea. And I actually have some dexters on my list too, but not in plain black. I bought some houndstooth ponte, which I’m really excited about.

Haley
Oh, that sounds good. See, if I had something like that, then maybe it wouldn’t have lingered on my sewing queue for so long. But I’m like, I have this black ponte. I need to use it. I literally bought it to make Dexter back when I designed it a few years ago. I’m like, this is the fall that it’s going to happen as we record this. It is fall. You will be listening to this in winter and hopefully by then I’ve done it.

So I want to dig into these tips in your process that you went through for designing your capsule wardrobe because I just think it is so interesting. So my first question is, where do you start when you’re designing a capsule wardrobe?

Sarai
Well, I think the first place you have to start is just in organizing your inspiration. So if you’re like me, you probably collect a lot of inspiration for your sewing in some format or another. I think most of us probably use something like Pinterest. Maybe you do it more manually. Maybe you have things that you actually print out or you have a mood board in your sewing room, but you probably have some way of collecting stuff that just inspires you for future projects.

So I mentioned that in the video we did on using Pinterest for your sewing. And if you haven’t watched that video. Go ahead and check it out. It’s on our YouTube channel. But I mentioned that in that video that I have a wish list board. And that board is a wish list for things that I want to either buy or make. Most of them are things that I want to make. Some of them are things like new boots or something that I want for the winter or whatever. So that is a really great place for me to start because I can organize it by type of garment.

So let’s say I have a pair of classic black wool trousers that I want to add to my wardrobe, or I’m thinking about adding to my wardrobe, kind of just on my wish list for now. So I’ll have a subfolder within that for blackboard trousers and I can save ideas for outfits or variations or different styles or details all into that one folder within Pinterest. So that when it comes time to make them, if I decide to make them in the future, I don’t always, but if I do, I can go back to that and get a lot of ideas.

So this is a really good starting point for coming up with those outfit ideas. And it also makes me more excited to make them because I already have a whole bunch of ideas, details, inspiration all in one place. And it shows me that even something as simple as, for example, a pair of black wool trousers, can have all of these really cool design things that I can think about and incorporate. So that’s my first step is to keep your inspiration organized. Or if it’s not organized right now, you could kind of go through it and start putting it into these different types of garment folders. I find that super helpful. So that’s where I started.

Haley
So I know that something that a lot of people struggle with is kind of taking their inspiration, which a lot of the time is like for some people it can be really fantastical, it can be hard to bring it back down to earth. Do you have any tips for doing that?

Sarai
So what helps me with that, is just noticing what you’re actually wearing. So I personally, especially in the fall and winter when it gets cold out, I find myself wearing a lot of leggings and pull-on pants, as they knew before this. I feel like the term pull-on pants sounds like it’s for babies.

Haley
Like a pull-up.

Sarai
Like a pull-up diaper. Yeah, I don’t know. To me it’s a really funny word, but that’s what they are. You pull them on, you don’t have a fly or anything. But it made me realize that if I had dressier kind of fancier versions of pull-on pants, I’d probably wear them all the time because I would feel good in them, but they’d also be comfortable and easy to put on. I already know that I wear that a lot.

So looking for patterns in what you actually reach for and what you actually wear can be a great way to filter the inspiration that you’ve been collecting, and it might give you ideas for other things you might want to collect. So, for example, if I didn’t have a folder on my wish list for pull-on pants or whatever, I could start one and start collecting inspiration for that particular type of garment, knowing that I wear it a lot.

Haley
How did you decide how big to make your capsule wardrobe?

Sarai
Oh, that’s a good question. So that’s a tough decision because I always want to make more than I could possibly make. But knowing from past experience how that works out, I really wanted to be realistic with this one. So I stuck with only five pieces. I really wanted to focus on quality and on making things that I would have for a really long time. So I chose to just have five pieces, no more, in this capsule, and make them things that would really go together and be worn together. I think just looking at the circumstances of your life, but I think particularly looking at your past experience with sewing and how many things you actually are able to sew in a given month or two month or three month period. We’ll give you some hints about how much you’ll actually be able to create, and you might come up with other ideas you want to incorporate through this process. Nothing is set in stone after you’ve designed a capsule, so leaving yourself a little bit of wiggle room, I think is good as well. But that’s why I decided just to stick with five. So I would just say be realistic with yourself and really think about how much you can actually make and how much you actually even want to make.

Haley
You mentioned that you wanted all of your pieces to, like, go together and be able to warn together. How did you make sure that all of the pieces worked really well together?

Sarai
Well, I think this is one of the real strengths of the Design Your Wardrobe process, which is what I used for this. So it starts with designing a few different looks. So when you go through the Design Your Wardrobe process, what you do is you start with a color palette of fabric, so actual fabric swatches, and you choose some neutrals, some near neutrals, and some statement colors. So as I went through that, I decided that I wanted to keep this capsule pretty neutral. And the reason for that is, I think the fewer the pieces you have, the easier it’s going to be to mix and match. If you use neutrals. If you only are making five things and you only want to be wearing those five things, so you’re not incorporating other stuff from your wardrobe. And one of those things is hot pink. Maybe that works for you. Maybe you could wear a hot pink shirt once or twice a week and feel great about it. For me personally, I wanted things that would go with each other a lot more easily. So because it was so small, I chose to keep it pretty neutral. And I also chose mostly separates because that also makes it easier to mix and match.

Even though I love wearing dresses, I wear dresses quite a lot. But for this particular capsule wardrobe, I wanted to make sure that I was going to get the most bang for my buck. So I chose mostly separates.

So once I did that, kind of went through that process, sketched out a few looks. And if you’re doing the Design Your Wardrobe process and you’re not trying to build, like, a strict capsule wardrobe, you can also incorporate things that you already own if you want. So when we go through the Design Your Wardrobe class, we have videos all about this, but you can incorporate stuff that you have made before or that you already own to kind of design different looks. So that’s the next step is just sketching out what those outfits are going to be, how everything might go together, and kind of starting with the look level instead of individual garment level.

Haley
So then how do you take your looks and then break them down to garments that you can then add to your sewing queue?

Sarai
I think this is the really fun part for me. I like the process of designing the whole wardrobe and picking out the fabrics and the colors and putting everything together and imagining the looks. But my favorite part is really designing the individual garments in exactly the way I want.

So what I do here is—if you’re just kind of developing a wardrobe plan and you’re not doing a strict capsule, the first thing you’d want to do is take out the things that you already own from whatever looks you sketched and maybe just list out what’s left. And so you can create a list of whatever pieces are included in those looks that you designed.

And then the next step is just kind of to narrow it down based on whatever your original constraints are. So I talked about my constraints quite a bit. I wanted to only have five pieces. I wanted to have a very neutral, strict palette so I could use those constraints that I’d already come up with to narrow down what pieces I was going to keep and which pieces I was going to edit out or maybe make later. And the great thing about that is that if you take out some pieces and you decide you don’t have time to make, maybe you sketched looks that would require ten different pieces. You could allow yourself that creativity. Take out some of those pieces and those are things that you could add back in later and know that they’re going to go with things that you’ve already made. So that’s another real benefit to doing this kind of planning.

So then comes the fun part for me, which is sketching out all the details of each piece and choosing what pattern I’m going to use, what fabric I’m going to use, any hacks I’m going to do, or details that I’m going to add and really making those fine-grained decisions, which I think is really fun. I really enjoy that process. And during that, I can go back to my original inspiration, look through it. Maybe there’s other details that I didn’t think about before when I was originally planning this out that I could add back in now. And it’s just a really for me, it’s a really, really fun process of, you know, going from that original idea and then translating it down to those really small individual choices that make it something really personal to me.

So for my capsule wardrobe, I ended up with five garments, like I said. So I’ll just tell you real quick what those are to give you an idea of how things landed. So the first one is a really, really simple black wool aline mini skirt. So mini, not like super, super mini, but a shorter skirt. This is very, very simple, very classic. I know it’ll go with tons of stuff. I can wear it with sweater tights to keep warm in the fall and the winter. I’ll probably wear it in the spring as well. Something that will just last for years in my closet.

The next one. So I mentioned the pull-on pants thing. So I decided to make the Joss pants, which, if you’re not familiar with them, they are a pair of elastic, waste wider leg pants. And I’m going to do those in black silk. So a silk crepe de chine, just really soft, a little bit glamorous for pull on pants, I think. So I feel like that’s something that I would wear around the house. It’s something I could wear out and still feel really pretty. And so it’s my second one.

The third one I already mentioned, which is the Dexter pants. And I have a houndstooth fabric here that I’m going to use for those. So it’s like a black and cream with a few other little neutral colors mixed in small check houndstooth ponte. So again, it’s a pair of stretchy, comfortable pants that feel a little bit special and a little bit more chic than a pair of leggings, which is what I wear most of the time when I’m working from home in the winter. So it meets my criteria. You’ll notice like, all of these things, they meet these criteria, criteria that I’ve talked about already.

The fourth one is I’m going to take the Jo pattern, which is a very billowy dress with gathers at the top and a placket. And I’m going to turn that into a top. So I’m going to hack that one and turn it into a top that I could wear with all the bottoms that I just mentioned. And I’m really excited about that one because I think if that works out the way I’m imagining it in my head, that’s something that could become one of my tried and true patterns, something that I would wear quite a lot. And the last one is a white Orlando tee, because I just love, like, a basic scoop-neck tee. And I really want to make one in a very stretchy rib knit. I feel like I wear a lot of rib knits. They’re really comfortable. They look good, they’re nice and form fitting, but they have a lot of elastic to them. That’s my fifth one.

And all of these things are going to go together, and I can, you know, in my mind, I can imagine, you know, probably 10, 15, 20 different outfits I could create just from these five pieces. So I’m super excited. I’ve already started on some of these things, and I just know these are things that I’m going to be wearing for a really long time. So this process for me was really educational and really fun. So if it’s something that I think our listeners are interested in or think that might be helpful to them, I would encourage you to give it a go. You can use our Design Your Wardrobe process to do this, or you can do it on your own. It’s something that you can definitely customize to your own needs, but I would say give it a shot. It’s really an interesting exercise in examining what you actually need versus what you want.

All right, so that’s kind of it for today. I’m going to recap real quick the five takeaways that I had, the five tips that I had from this process just to kind of give you guys a little bit of a recap.

So the first one is organizing your inspiration, which is a great place to start. So I mentioned the wish list board that I have on Pinterest. That’s one way you can do it. It’s worked really well for me. So start with an organized form of inspiration.

And then notice what you actually wear. So take a look at what you’re actually wearing day to day. So, for me, for the example I used was that I like to wear pull-on pants. I like to wear pants that are really comfortable. So if that’s something that you wear all the time, you might want to incorporate it. So just look for those patterns and what you actually wear day to day.

And then the next step is to decide how many pieces that you want to make. So really try to be realistic with yourself about how much you can actually sew if you’re planning to sew a capsule wardrobe. And that’s why I stuck with only five patterns for mine.

And then the next step is to design a few looks to create — you can create more looks than you think that you’ll need because you’re going to be editing in the next step. But start with designing a few different looks, a few different outfits that you could wear and you could really see yourself wearing and that fit your own life.

And then to take those from looks to individual pieces, you want to list out what’s contained in those looks and then start editing down. So narrow it down based on whatever constraints you’ve already placed on yourself, like how many pieces you want to make, how it fits into your palette that you’ve decided on, all that good stuff.

And then it’s time to sketch out all the details of each piece, like the pattern you use and your fabric choice and all that great stuff, and end up with a small list of however many garments you want in your capsule wardrobe. For me, it was five.

So hopefully that’s a helpful process for you. But again, if you need a little bit more guidance or you want to go through this with other people or Design Your Wardrobe program is a really great place to start with that.

So what do you think, Haley? What’s your big takeaway from this episode?

Haley
I think something that has got me thinking a bit is how to motivate yourself to sew those more wardrobe staples—so things that might feel a little bit less exciting to sew. I thought we brought up a couple of good tips in the beginning, using fabric you’re excited about, including details. You’re excited about my trick of sewing it side by side with something you can kind of batch sew in a similar color. But also it feels really motivating to look at your capsule wardrobe process and seeing all of these wardrobe staples together as a unit. And viewing that kind of end product is really inspiring and motivational when it comes to getting yourself and giving yourself kind of the kick of the pants you need to get started on these kinds of projects.

Sarai
Definitely. I think your tip about doing the batch sewing was my biggest takeaway from this episode. It’s something I thought about a little bit, but I think that would really just make life a lot easier, especially if you’re doing a capsule wardrobe like this and you have a lot of things that are going to be in the same color or the same fabric. It’s a really great way. And I really liked what you said about kind of using that to sweeten the pot and make it a little bit more motivating to make something that might feel a little bit boring by batching it with something that’s a little bit more exciting. I think that’s really a really cool idea.

Haley
So the takeaway is to trick yourself.

Sarai
Trick yourself when you need to. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with tricking yourself when you need to.

Haley
Absolutely not.

Sarai
Motivation isn’t free. You got to work for it sometimes.

All right, well, if you want to learn more about this kind of thing, if you’re a Seamwork member, we have a free PDF called the Style Workshop, which walks you through ten different exercises to help you define your style. So if that’s something that you’re kind of struggling with, you might want to check that out. So if you’re a Seamwork member, we’ll put a link to that in the show notes, and we also have a video called Five Fall Out Formulas that Haley and I did. So if you’re looking for some outfit formulas, I think they apply to fall or winter, you can check those out as well. And then I’ve mentioned Design Your Wardrobe many times in this episode because I do think it’s such a great process for going through something like this. So Design Your Wardrobe is something that we offer to Seamwork members, so it’s really popular. We have thousands of people sign up every time we run it. It’s one of our premium courses, but it is free to our members, and it walks you through a process of designing a collection of projects for a single season.

So whether that be winter or fall, winter or spring, summer, we do it twice a year as a group course, but we also have a self-guided program if you’re kind of in between seasons, right now. I do recommend signing up for the group course. We’re going to be opening it up pretty soon. I don’t know the exact date we’re going to start it, but we usually do. Sign-ups begin in late February or early March. So keep an eye out for that, because it’s really fun to do together and see what other people are designing and making and just getting a lot of inspiration.

So you can learn more about that at Seamwork.com/go/DYW (stands for Design Your Wardrobe). And if you just want a taste of what’s included in it, we have a free sewing planner, which you can get at Seamwork.com/go/free-planner. We have some free patterns too, but that’s the free planner that you can use on your own if you want to. We also use it as part of Design Your Wardrobe. That’s free for anybody.

So that wraps us up for today. So if you liked this episode, we would love it if you could leave us a review. We’ve been getting a lot more reviews on Apple podcasts lately, which is awesome. We would love to hear your review. Or if you just want to tap the stars and give us a five star rating, we would appreciate that as well. It really helps other people to find the show, and we also love reading what you guys write. So thank you to everybody who’s left us a rating or review. We really appreciate it.

And I’ve also mentioned our YouTube channel many times today, and you can follow us on YouTube at Seamworkvideo. We have fresh videos going up every single week over there, and if you like the content here, you’re going to love the content there as well. Haley and I are doing so many cool videos over there. We’re really experimenting a lot with different styles, so I’m going to be doing a lot more kind of project-based videos coming up this year, so really, really excited about that. So check us out if you haven’t already.

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